Section 002, Instructor: Sezgin Ayabakan

Weekly Question #2: Complete by September 13

Leave your response as a comment on this post by the beginning of class on September 13, 2017. Remember, it only needs to be three or four sentences. For these weekly questions, I’m mainly interested in your opinions, not so much particular “facts” from the class!

If you sign in using your AccessNet ID and password you won’t have to fill in the name, email and captcha fields when you leave your comment.

Here is the question (well, it’s not really a question):

Find an online article dated within last two weeks from a credible source that has something to do with data. It can be about the role of data or an interesting data-driven analysis. It should also be relevant to your major and of interest to you. Copy and paste the URL directly into your response followed by a few sentences that explain what is interesting about it.

You can use any of the sources under the “Great Data Sites” menu on the right sidebar of this page, or you can use any online news or magazine site.

51 Responses to Weekly Question #2: Complete by September 13

  • http://www.dataversity.net/standardizing-data-management-data-governance-services-first-look/

    I found this article to be interesting because it discusses the increased demand for data management among many industries in the world, which was eye opening because I never knew how large the demand was for data management and analysis. The article was interesting because it describes how different industries utilize data and where data managers are needed across the workforce

  • http://flowingdata.com/2017/09/06/cost-of-hurricane-harvey/

    This is about the cost of Hurricane Harvey. What is interesting about this article is that since there are many different weather events that cost billions of dollars, hurricane Harvey is the 2nd most costliest behind hurricane Katrina. Over the span of 2 months, it costed hurricane Harvey between $70-108 billion. So basically, the more severe the storms are the more costlier they are. I am shocked that it costs this much for the amount of damage Harvey has done to Houston and the surrounding areas. It is also cool to see all the other weather events with how much each costs.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/hurricane-harveys-impact-and-how-it-compares-to-other-storms/
    This interesting article concludes that hurricane Harvey is “one of the most damaging and costly natural disasters in U.S. history.” Due to this horrible disaster, one of the major concerns is the economic impacts. The inserted report of the article shows that hurricane Harvey has already cost over $100 billion. This enormous amount of money renovates my perspective on how natural disasters can damage, and leads my interests on how government might handle this tough situation economically, rapidly, and effectively.

  • http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/heres-what-the-nfl-career-passing-leaderboard-will-look-like-in-2025/

    This article is interesting because it is trying to predict what the ranking of career passing yards among quarterbacks will be in 2025. It is not completely realistic because it consists of quarterbacks who are currently in the NFL, so some of whom will not be in the league that long. However, it is intriguing to see what the algorithm created by fivethirtyeight predicts. If their predictions were to come true, then many of the quarterbacks we are watching now, will be at the top of the history books in a few years.

  • http://how-to-fix-a-toilet.com
    I found this article interesting because it collected data form people’s most searched “How To’s” on the internet, based on their location. The data provided information as to what people needed to know how to do, topping the list was “how to fix a toilet”, and “how to tie a tie.” The data was gathered throughout the world so it was intriguing to see what people from different region’s of the world need to know how to do.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/students-at-most-colleges-dont-pick-useless-majors/

    I think this article is interesting, it tells us how important it is to pick a right major for yourself by showing some examples. It also gives us the chart that shows the percentage of the most popular majors at less selective colleges and most selective colleges. In this article it shows us the importance of pick the right major to study at the right college, so students wouldn’t waste their time on the majors that they are not interested in. This article tells us whether or not need choose your major depends on what college you are in, you can also choose your major depends on your interest.

  • https://nation.maps.arcgis.com/apps/Cascade/index.html?appid=de7f932e3a1d494f9c9d9a67fb0de646
    This article uses data on median household prices and median incomes across the United States to determine how many working years it would take a person to buy a house in any particular region. I found it interesting because of how useful it could be in picking where to live in the future if I ever want to move somewhere far and new. The most expensive places to live were on the west coast and in major east coast cities like New York, with median house prices reaching and exceeding ten years of median salary. The cheapest places to live were on the “wheat belt” center portion of the United States, where median house prices were mostly below three years median salary.

  • https://www.fool.com/investing/2017/09/08/why-the-cheesecake-factorys-stock-lost-13-august.aspx
    “Why The Cheesecake Factory’s Stock Lost 13% in August”
    This article is interesting to me because it is surprising that the cheesecake stock can drop so much in one month. They have a reasonable explanation that it is because the colder weather affects cheesecake selling. When the selling drops, it impacts stock price as well. This article can also be a good example to study about shifting of demand.

  • https://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2017/aug/22/how-much-do-abortions-cost-across-australia-explainer
    This article discusses the medical procedure of abortion in Australia. It includes a data-based analysis of the costs and access to abortion depending on territory and state in Australia. It also includes a graphic depicting the criminalization, cost, and availability of abortion across the country. What makes this interesting is that the data is reflective of the populations within different territories in Australia. The areas with more rural populations might not criminalize abortion, but they make the cost of the procedure higher than the more urban regions of Australia. This data can potentially be metadata, as it describes more than just the statistics on abortion in Australia.

  • https://www.wsj.com/articles/equifax-reports-data-breach-possibly-impacting-143-million-u-s-consumers-1504819765

    I found this article quite interesting as was reading this breaking news of Equifax being hacked from the Wall Street Journal because it comes to show that no matter how much we feel web sites protect our information, none of them are perfect. The question comes to me whether or not I should be a 100% worried and what could I do on my end to protect my personal information I put on sites? It’s like the saying “there’s no such thing as being perfect.” Although the internet can be much reliable than humans, we have to keep in my mind these websites did not create out of thin air– people created them in the first place.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/forecast-hurricane-irma/
    This article talks about how the Hurricane Irma may become the worst case. It analyzed different data of sustained winds from different areas, then the National Hurricane Center gave a forecast about the climate in Miami based on the data they analyzed. What made me feel interested is that the process they analyzed date, the purpose they analyzed data. They made specific data turn into information that may truly help the people who live in that area to do well the prevention.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/how-to-win-a-nuclear-standoff/
    This article states about date can calculate what you get and what you lost. In addition, you also can analyze what you should do or what you should not by using date. This article interested me because it begins with a little game to calculate what the consequences if you do something or if you want to do something, it can bring you some benefits and it also brings something that can really hurt you.

  • http://www.marketwatch.com/story/10-year-treasury-yield-hovers-above-key-2-level-2017-09-08
    This article I pulled from Market Watch highlights the movement of bonds. Particularly the US 10 year bond which is a key indicator that is used to track and predict where inflation will possibly be headed in the future. Between North Korea and numerous natural disasters currently making headlines, most economist are fearing that the 10 year bonds might be heading below 2%. This is a key number that they are watching in the coming weeks and months ahead.

  • http://flowingdata.com/2017/09/07/thirty-years-of-hurricanes/
    I thought this article was interesting. This includes the data which shows the floods that occurred in the past thirty years. It also shows the wind speed and the time of the hurricane. It used different colors to indicate the hurricane category. This data could be used to predict a hurricane that might occur in the future.

  • http://flowingdata.com/2017/08/15/useless-points-of-comparison/
    This article was interesting for two separate reasons. First off it was data on a wide range of things that were totally random. However, most of them were important information, such as the correlation between someones birth weight and height and the fallacies that go along with this info. But the part that caught my eye was the data showing the difference in prices of different products now compared to 1980 due to inflation. The info showed us that even though the actual numerical amount is higher, the price has actually gone down because the value of a dollar in 1980 compared to today is about 3 times less and the price of these goods did not go up 3 times the amount in 1980.

  • https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/sep/10/should-robot-be-your-childs-best-friend

    This article is interesting because it talks about a mini robot (which is also affordable), that could potentially be the new children’s toy. The robot can give emotional engagement to communicate with the children which clearly shows the use of all different types of data. The founders got their inspiration to bring robots to life from movies like Wall-E and R2-D2 from star wars. They say this robot has “ginormous piece of software” thats bring this little friend to life.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/students-at-most-colleges-dont-pick-useless-majors/
    This article with the data mentioned in it points out an interesting phenomenon that students regard the higher level education as an investment to their life, rather than learning something they are interested in. With this data, we can know what majors are the most popular among all the choices. We can also get the information that many students change their majors to more “useful” majors when they are applying for graduate school. This article can make the students who are facing the choice have more comprehensive and deeper considerations.

  • https://www.theringer.com/nfl/2017/9/8/16272694/best-young-quarterback-derek-carr-marcus-mariota-dak-prescott
    This article uses many different types of data in order to analyze young NFL quarterback’s and how successful they will be in the future. The data that was analyzed includes statistics such as interception rates (%), passing yards per game, etc. The article also used data from each quarterback’s supporting cast and how the players around the quarterback will help his future. The last piece of data that was used in the article was videos and highlights in order to show readers of the type of talent the different quarterbacks have. From all of this data, the writer made a comparison between all quarterbacks and their odds to be “best of their generation.”

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/hurricane-harveys-impact-and-how-it-compares-to-other-storms/

    This article was interesting to me because it showed the sheer financial impact that huge storms have on our country. This being one of the larger storms in recent memory it is interesting to see how it stacks up to other storms. My major is finance, and it relates to this story because of the huge financial impact that these storms have on the country.

  • Forecasts have done a good job predicting Irmas shifting path: https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/forecasts-have-done-a-good-job-predicting-irmas-shifting-path/

    I find this articles really interesting as it mentioned the improvement of forecasting techniques over the few decades. It also stated that there were less errors in this decade than in the past, which also meant that technology and science has developed effectively and helped people with better preparation for natural disasters. This could impact greatly on the safety of the local citizens as well as the infrastructure.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/irma-is-bearing-down-on-some-of-floridas-most-vulnerable-residents/
    This article shows vulnerable people in Florida face a serious problem when Irma came. The data in the article shows there three types of vulnerable people, migrants workers, Floridians live in mobile home and older Floridians. According to the data, we will find out how many percentage of these people and what are the locations of these people. Government can use the data and save people at first time.

  • https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/08/07/upshot/music-fandom-maps.html?mcubz=1
    I think this article is interesting, because it stets out to map the contours of music fandom and culture in the United States. It is easier to see the popularity of fifty singers in the United Sates. Each map shows relative popularity in different parts of the country. If one part of a map is lighter, it doesn’t mean people there weren’t watching the artist’s videos; it just means fans were more likely to listen to a variety of other artists.

  • http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/we-gave-you-a-spelling-quiz-and-it-didnt-go-great/
    This article includes some data about “the words in spelling quiz were hardest for readers” and “most common misspellings for each quiz word” at Scripps National Spelling Bee. The similar pronunciation is the major cause to lead spelling mistake, also “double letters can mean trouble”. This article makes me interested because nowadays most writing system can help us check our spelling mistake and correct it automatically, at least it will highlight the misspelling words to remind us, such as Microsoft. Does these convenient tools bring any influence to people? From this article, I may say that this might decline people’s words spelling ability.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/what-100-year-old-hurricanes-could-teach-us-about-irma/

    This article is interesting because it gives us information about the history of hurricanes and what it may foreshadow in the future. The article talks about how climate change has played a role in the monster hurricanes this year. I also found it very interesting that there is evidence that supports that hurricanes go through multidecadal cycles, meaning that from 1970 to 1990 was a so-called hurricane drought.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/politicians-write-lots-of-books-heres-how-far-into-them-people-read/

    I thought that this article was interesting as it explored an avenue of data that I think rarely is looked at. The way that the author of the article went about finding the data was also very interesting, despite the fact that there is no way of knowing how far people read he decided to see how far people listen in audiobooks.
    The article is not only interesting because of its subjext matter, but also because of the way that the author decided to find the information, showing that data for almost everything is available if people can find the right way to search for it.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/politicians-write-lots-of-books-heres-how-far-into-them-people-read/

    I thought that this article was interesting as it explored an avenue of data that I think rarely is looked at. The way that the author of the article went about finding the data was also very interesting, despite the fact that there is no way of knowing how far people read he decided to see how far people listen in audiobooks.
    The article is not only interesting because of its subject matter, but also because of the way that the author decided to find the information, showing that data for almost everything is available if people can find the right way to search for it.

  • As a finance major student, I was not sure how to use data or Big Data in finance. I found this article answering some of my questions about the role and effect of data in finance and trading and why big data became more important today than before. The article is about the benefits of big data analysis and machine learning in the financial industry and how big data is influencing finance and trading in three ways: 1. Technical Analysis, which is the study of prices by using charts. 2. Real Time Analytics, the mathematical models, and algorithmic trading. 3. Machine Learning, which is the algorithms you feed your data with to get smarter. Finally, Big data is expected to have a bigger role in finance and trading than this which is only the start. https://dzone.com/articles/the-role-of-big-data-in-finance-and-trading

  • http://www.marketwatch.com/story/americans-would-save-22-billion-if-they-did-all-their-shopping-online-2017-09-09
    Although, this is not directly related to my major, I study IT – so any data analysis is somewhat related 😀
    This article is a very shocking read. It shows how much people saves and ~can~ save if were to shop exclusively online. Now, people generally take online shopping for granted, but after this article, I am going to spend rest of my paycheck on Amazon 🙂

  • https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2017/09/the-trump-voter-fraud-commissions-data-problem/539547/

    Its from reading content like this that helped my pick statistics and data analytics as my major. I was always fascinated by the facts and numbers that politicians would through out during debates or campaign. I would always wonder where they would get them from and where was there proof. As I got older and took some stats classes i was able to figure out. So now when Trump make claims of mass voter in California, I have a basic under standing on how that statement might be flawed.

  • I found this article interesting because the SOA formed a Longevity Advisory Group to create new projects aimed at the study of longevity, mortality modeling, and new techniques for assessing and predicting future mortality improvement results. http://www.theactuarymagazine.org/retirement-risks/

  • This article is interesting because of the insight it offers to current and future generations. It reveals that the incomes in the US are slowly reaching where they were before the crisis in 2008. This points towards job growth and less poverty. However, a particular point that stood out was that the top 5% of earners in the US, who had a median wage of $375,000, brought in more that 20% of the overall income gains. This statistic provides as an interesting perspective on wealth distribution as so much of the total earnings in 2016 were from such a small percentage of the work force. It will also be interesting to see the continual job growth and outlook in the following years to track how much money is going into the upper, middle, and lower classes.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/everyone-needs-to-calm-down-about-the-dodgers-and-indians/
    I’m a communication studies major, so anything revolving around sports is right up my alley. This article posted on FiveThirtyEight talks about how we shouldn’t overreact to what’s been happening with the Indians and Dodgers. By using data they were able to find that late season winning percentage doesn’t make playoff success more predictive. It’ll also depend on who’s pitching for their teams come postseason time. FiveThirtyEight also uses it’s Elo ratings which include many different factors that can help determine whether a team will have the same potential outcome in the postseason as the team had at the end of the regular season.

  • https://www.apartmentlist.com/rentonomics/national-rent-data/
    This article shows apartment list national rent report in 2017. I thought this was interesting because it was associate with students’ daily lives and finance problem. When I saw those line chart, I could know which mouths’ rent free are lowest during one year. As a result, when I sign a contract in the mouth of lowest rent free, I may save huge money during a year. And the article also have average rent free in different cities and rent growth line chart. This will make I better estimate the developing of price of rent.

  • http://www.dataversity.net/big-data-security-scared-death/
    What I found interesting about this article, was how it broke down the ways in which big data will affect us as humans. The environment, individual people, and the ways in which cyber criminals can seriously harm these two groups in more ways than expected. The article talks about the fearfulness that should be involved with big data, but then it tells you how to monitor, and patrol your own cyber network in order to preserve its safety.

  • https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/12/travel/vacation-apps.html?rref=collection%2Ftimestopic%2FSocial%20Media&action=click&contentCollection=timestopics&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=4&pgtype=collection

    This article talks about all the ways data collected during your travels can make your trips seem more memorable. You could find out new music to add to your playlist or record new sights to recommend for others who go to the same spot for their vacation. There are all sorts of apps to download that help organize your trips and allow you to remember specific information such as location,date,time. It’s interesting to read about because technology has intertwined with most aspects of our lives that we use it to connect with others to stay up to date and inform other people of our adventures. The detailed information that you may forget later can be retrieved through your phone and its a digital diary in a way because it will always be there remembering what you did.

  • Here is the link https://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2016/mar/16/the-top-10-sources-of-data-for-international-development-research
    This article shows ” The top ten sources of data for international development research.” There are some important aspects to tell readers the analysis data. For example, the reader announces Economic Atlas, the globe of economic complexity, the armed conflict and so on. All in all, this article is integrated that includes many angles of human, whatever the economy and humanity. Personally, my major is International business, so I will get more sensitive when I saw articles that have some relationships with the economy.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-mayweather-mcgregor-fight-as-told-through-emojis/

    This article is interesting because it is about what is probably the biggest fight in history. It uses the emojis that describes each fighter and when they were used during certain events in the fight. Using data from twitter to get the information, they use graphs with emojis to tell the story of the fight and lets you know what is generally happening. Enjoyed how they brought in a huge part of todays modern world (emojis) to show peoples emotions through this mega fight. I watched the fight and looking at each of these graphs it kinda shows my own emotions.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/everyone-needs-to-calm-down-about-the-dodgers-and-indians/

    This is an artlicle by Neil Paine of Fuvethirtyeight discussing the upcoming MLB playoffs. In the media now, I have seen commentators continuously bring up “momentum” in the month of September as an indicator for how playoff games will go. Paine rejects this and uses fuvethirtyeight’s “ELO” scores to disprove the notion of momentum. I found this interesting because long held beliefs like momentum in sports are now being challenged by data and traditional views of valuable players and teams are being changed by the introduction of sabremetrics and other more quantitative methods of covering sports.

  • https://www.thestreet.com/story/14295573/1/hurricane-irma-has-insurance-stocks-running-for-cover.html
    This article talks about how big damage it would be for the insurance companies as well as other retailers when Hurricane Irma hit Florida in USA. It showed a huge jump in the stock price for some retailers such as Costco, Depot. Inc or Lowe’s due to higher demand from local residents in Florida. On the other hand, Insurance companies such as Universal Insurance and Federated National went down 16.9% and 15.3% respectively. The reason was that insurance companies would suffer a financial loss in order to cover all these damages from Hurricane Irma. Hurricane Irma also affected Traveling companies such as Allstate Corp, Travelers and Chubb Ltd because less tourists wanted to visit Florida and less flight will be taken during the Hurricane.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-job-market-is-having-a-goldilocks-moment/
    This article details the current growth of the economy and the room for new jobs in the market. What I found interesting in the article was that economists had used statistics to see that the economy seems to be nearing full employment. This is appealing to me and should be to majority of my peers because we are all reaching a point where we will need jobs. The significance of full employment is that once this point is reached, most employers will have to raise the wages to attract more workers. I was never aware of this information before and I find it quite motivating. There were several graphs used in the article and the data used in each all had slight differences that were interpreted differently.

  • https://skift.com/2016/06/17/tripadvisors-instant-booking-push-may-signal-larger-trend-in-booking-behavior/

    This article is interesting because it discusses the current trends in hotel booking. The industry is seeing a lot of change in the way people find hotel rooms because people aren’t going directly to hotel sights anymore. More and more people are beginning to use referral sights to find cheaper rooms rather than the prices posted on the companies sight.

  • http://flowingdata.com/2017/09/11/most-female-and-male-occupations-since-1950/

    This article is about the jobs that men and women do since the 1950’s to present day. It talked about what type of jobs women had compared to men in the 1950 and how it changes throughout the years and how many women worked compared to women. It should graphs on what type of jobs women tend to have compared to men. Men have a higher percentage working in jobs that have to deal with hands on and very heavy materials. Women have the higher percentage working in social jobs and normally work in jobs that help others.

  • https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/datablog/2017/jul/02/us-healthcare-broken-system-one-chart

    This article is about life expectancy compared to private health care spending. It contains data from many different countries and shows how the U.S is very disproportion compared to the rest when it comes to cost over life expectancy. This article is interest to me as I always thought as such a developed nation this country would have the highest life expectancy, although I must admit I am not surprised to see that the cost per person is the highest.

  • http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/08/29/views-of-racism-as-a-major-problem-increase-sharply-especially-among-democrats/

    This is an article based on a national survey conducted by Pew Research Center which summarises the number of people who consider racism as a major has increased over the last few years and also articulates that more white Americans, as well as Americans of African descent, consider racism as a major has increased.Given that I am a political science major this data is important in indicating how much the population is polarized around which is very important information for political scientists.

  • http://flowingdata.com/2017/09/08/mortgages-in-terms-of-years-of-working-life/
    This article is based on research conducted by john Nelson about the complexity of buying a house. The way he displayed the data that he collected was with a map showing the relative affordability of homes, given the median income and median home value of each county. This article caught my attention because buying a house is something that most people aspire to do at one point in their lives so having some background information on it is important.

  • http://www.schaeffersresearch.com/content/options/2017/09/12/options-traders-react-to-another-big-twitter-stock-win-streak
    This article shows why Twitter’s stock price has increased over the past several days due to investors confidence in the stock as a result of the data showing an increase in volumes traded and projected price increases over the next month; based on trends with the stock’s previous prices. A graph of Twitter’s 100 day moving averages also presents a set of data the clearly shows that Twitter’s value is not only stable but also showing signs of growth. As an economics major, being able to easily recognize patterns with the use of data is a key part of what I will need to do in order to know how the markets are currently working and are projected to work in the foreseeable future.

  • http://lenagroeger.com/datagifs/#/14
    The link above show contains a GIF that shows Americans’ political polarization from years 1994-2015. As a
    person with a moderate political view I find it fascinating that people fell mostly to the left or right in the year 2015. I’m majoring in marketing, and with this information one can determine that it is necessary to market either to left-minded people or right-minded people, since they exist in the majority as of recent.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/al-gores-new-movie-exposes-the-big-flaw-in-online-movie-ratings/
    I found the data show that people evaluate movies may have sorts of biases. For example, women like the continued-movie, but the men are not. To my surprise, the movie’s IMDb workers are mostly men. Men wants more creative, and they have different judgement from women. Therefore, we cannot rely on the evaluation of the movie to judge the movie is good or bad, because everyone has different taste.

  • http://www.foxbusiness.com/features/2017/09/13/amazon-plans-mega-warehouse-for-mexico-growth-spurt-report.html
    This article is about a warehosue in mexico near the border to the US that is going to be a distribution center for amazon. This will allow amazon to compete in the competitive foreign market.The data says that they have doubled their profits since last year which they say allows them to take a possible risk into the new mexico market. They are trying to use risk management and data to expand their business and make for better efficiency with delivering items.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Office Hours

Sezgin Ayabakan, PhD (Instructor)

Office: 201B Speakman Hall

Office hours: 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm, Mondays and Wednesdays, Main Campus

ITA information

Prince Patel

prince@temple.edu

Office: Speakman 209

Office Hours: Fridays 10:00am – 12:00pm