Section 003, Instructor: Laurel Miller

Weekly Question #10: Complete by November 17, 2016

Leave your response as a comment on this post by the beginning of class on November 17, 2016. Remember, it only needs to be three or four sentences. For these weekly questions, I’m mainly interested in your opinions, not so much particular “facts” from the class!

Here is the question:

Think about a data-driven service that you use regularly (i.e., Blackboard, Amazon.com, Facebook). Imagine you want to store the data for that service in a spreadsheet – what would each row in the spreadsheet represent? What would some of the data columns be?

(For example, Yelp.com stores restaurant reviews. A row would be an individual review, and some columns would be the name of the restaurant, the type of food they serve, the address, the star rating, and the name of the reviewer.)

55 Responses to Weekly Question #10: Complete by November 17, 2016

  • One data-driven service that I have used recently is the Tapingo mobile ordering app. An excel spreadsheet documenting this data would include each individual order as a separate row and some of the columns would include customer name, restaurant/store name, total purchase price, time of order, time of pick up.

  • A data-driven service which I use regularly is Amazon. When creating an excel spreadsheet .to document this data, each row in the spreadsheet will represent the various vendors that have certain commodities available for sale. Some of the columns would include the price of the item, the product description, color, size, customer reviews, shipping details and perhaps the Best Seller Rank.

  • A Data-Driven Service that people use regularly is Twitter. In an excel spreadsheet the rows would represent your twitter account. Next, the columns could represent the followers, people who you are following, your tweets, your retweets, and your likes.

  • A data-driven service I use is the ESPN fantasy football website. In an excel spreadsheet, each row would represent the players from different teams. Then, the columns would represent their individual stats such as touchdowns, receptions, yards, and the teams that faced that week.

  • The data-driven service I use is Blackboard. If I am going to store the data for tat service in a spreadsheet, A row would be a student, and the columns would be course name,course ID, professor name, announcement, grades.

  • One data driven source I use often is Amazon. In an Excel spreadsheet, each row could represent a product I’m interested in buying. For example, if I’m looking to buy a vacuum, each row would list a vacuum made by a different company. The columns could then include price, customer ratings, size/weight, and color. This would allow me to compare vacuum makers and find the vacuum that best fits what I’m looking for.

  • A data driven source I use is ESPN.com. In an excel spreadsheet, each row could represent the different sports on the website such as Football, Soccer, Basketball, etc. The columns could represent the different teams in the sports and the various athletes.

  • A data-driven service that I use pretty regularly would be LinkedIn. If I were to store the data from LinkedIn, there would be multiple avenues of data to explore. Each individual row would essentially be a user that uses the service. The columns for each user could be a myriad of things ranging from current employer, previous employers, education (univeristy), the amount of certifications including seperate sheet that includes the types of certifications, the user’s personal data such as their DOB, the amount of skills/endorsements that the user has, the amount of coursework, and the amount of languages that the user can speak. There’s a ton of data that can be categorized into columns when you’re using LinkedIn and analyzing it could be extremely useful to determining networking advantages.

  • A data-driven service that I regularly use is Blackboard. If I were to create a spreadsheet for this data each row would be each individual class I’m registered for. The columns would consist of the term the course is being taken, the professors name, the course ID, location, time, and grades.

  • A data-driven service that I use regularly is Uber. Each row in a spreadsheet would represent a trip in an uber car. The columns could be who the driver was, how far they traveled, how much the trip costed, the location or locations of where the uber went, how many passengers, and what size uber they took. Uber can gather a lot of data from just one trip.

  • A data driven service I use often is lyft. In the spreadsheet I could use the rows to represent each lyft drive I’ve taken. The columns could show the price of the particular lyft, how many miles the drive was, my pickup location, my destination, and what driver I had.

  • A data-driven service I use regularly is Woot. An online discount shopping site managed by Amazon. If I was to create an excel spreadsheet to document this data, each row will represent
    each individual order. The columns would include customer name, address, product, category, number of Items, price per item, total purchase price, date of order, and date of delivery.

  • A data-driven service I use regularly is Facebook. If I created an excel spreadsheet to manage the data i would include each of my friends individual names in the rows. The columns would include our relationship (friend, dad, etc.), their email address, phone number, number of photos together, date we became Facebook friends, number of mutual friends and number of groups we both belong to.

  • A data-driven service that I regularly use is Netflix. If I created an excel sheet based on Netflix data, the rows would be the name of each movie/ TV show. The columns could include whether it’s a movie/ TV show, genre, rating (out of 5 stars), program description, length of movie (or average length for TV shows), main actor names, awards nominated for/ won, production company, whether it’s available on Netflix DVD/ online/ both, etc.

  • To make a spreadsheet for Facebook’s data would be like making a spreadsheet of a maximum 1,750,000 real people in the world. I find this particularly interesting because, unlike like a quantitative report on more than a million people such as the US Census, we get a qualitative look at living humans by such large amounts. Each row would represent a personal look inside a users life, point of view, and behavior (assuming we ignore fake Facebook accounts and spam). The columns would represent what Facebook already asks for with every new account: Work, Education, Places You’ve Lived, Contact, Basic Info, Family, Relationships, Personal Details, and Life Events. You can go even further with liked pages, analysis of posts, shared photos and videos, and even group chats. However, this kind of data is considered and idealized as safe from commercial and spam use. Facebook promises security and not exploitation. So, it’s unlikely this data will ever become open to anyone who can’t be tracked by Facebook itself.

  • A data-driven service that I regularly use is TUmail. If I were to create an Excel spreadsheet, the rows would consist of the names of the people/companies/organizations that have emailed me. The columns might include my relationship with them (professor-student, organization-member, company-customer, etc.) In addition, the columns may include the number of emails that I have received from particular users and the number of emails that I have sent back to them. Lastly, a column might include the location of where the email was sent from in order to show the relationship between the sender and the specific location that the sender is affiliated with.

  • A data driven service that all Temple Students use every semester is the class registration system. If I were to create an excel spread sheet, the row would represent the course, and the columns would represent the title, the CRN, the credits, time, location, and instructor.

  • A data-driven service that I use all the time is Amazon.com. I have amazon prime so pretty much all of the things that I order are shipped to me within 2 days, so it’s incredibly convenient and I use my account regularly. All of my previous orders could be compiled into a spreadsheet and I would make each row be the name of each individual item that I ordered. Potential columns could be: the date that I purchased the item, the company that makes the item, the merchant or seller who distributed the item, the category of item that each product would fall into, where the item was shipped from, the cost of the item, where the item was originally made, and even maybe get even as specific as what materials the individual item is made out of. All of this information would be very interesting to look at on a spreadsheet, and depending on how detailed I want to get with he columns, mang inferences could be made from this data.

  • I use GroupMe, a messaging app designed for group chats. If I organized GroupMe data into an Excel spreadsheet, each row would represent an individual message. Some columns would be the identity of the sender, the name of the chat to which the message is posted, the message’s timestamp, and the number of likes each message receives.

  • a data driven site I use daily is Netflix. The rows would be the different genres I watch like comedy, action or drama. Then there would be a list of tv shows and movies. Also newest show and movies to oldest.

  • A data-driven serviced that I use in my everyday life is Amazon. In Excel spreadsheet each row can be different seller or online merchant, and the columns could include the price, size, specific description of the product, feature, and overall evaluation score, etc.

  • A data site I use daily is Twitter. If you had to store the data in a spreadsheet, the rows would be a person’s username. In the columns of the spreadsheet, you would put if the person’s tweets that he personally tweeted, then whatever he retweeted that wasn’t his own. You would also put what he liked or favorited on Twitter and even what he commented on but didn’t necessarily tweet or like. You could also put what account the person views the most or shows the most action on Twitter towards such as what like retweets/likes the most.

  • A data-driven service that I use on a daily basis is the ESPN fantasy mobile app. If we were to look at the data from this service in a spreadsheet, I would imagine that rows would contain individual players and each column would contain things such as points scored, points projected, previous points scored, opponent they are facing, etc.

  • A data driven service that I use regularly is the yahoo fantasy sports app. Rows could include Each players name. The columns would contain the players projected points, actual points, amount of yards, amount of touchdowns ect..

    Another way to look at it would be rows contain the team, while the columns contain the teams record, winning percentage, points for , points against ect..

  • A data driven service I use regularly would be Uber and Lyft. Each row would represent each individual ride that I have taken. The data columns would include all of the extra information such as driver name, car, ride duration, pickup location, dropoff location, and total price of the ride.

  • A data driven service that I use is Blackboard to check my grades and notifications from my courses. The row would be the name of the individual student. The column would include Tuid, date of birth, classes taken, grades in those classes, etc.

  • A data driven service that use is my banking app in order to check bank statements and balances. The columns would show things like the date, checking balance, withdraws, purchases, deposits, pending withdraws, and pending deposits. A row would be a given days’ or specific time periods’ activity.

  • A data driven service that I use is Amazon. The rows will show the products’ name, and column will show price, qualities, type, expire date, place products come from.

  • A data driven service that I use is Twitter. The row would include a person’s username. The columns would include their tweets, retweets, quote tweets, favorites, and posts with pictures and videos included.

  • A data driven service that i often use is schedulefly. The row would include the employees username. The columns would include your shifts, other employees, shifts available, employees phone numbers, employees birthdays, and managers messages.

  • A data driven service that I use everyday is Spotify. I imagine the rows would be the name of the song, and the columns would be the song genre, artists, song duration, and instruments used.

  • A data-driven service that I use is twitter. If I was labeling rows to separate my data I would use individual user profiles to start. This would include username, real name, and amount for followers/following. I would label other rows with search data and most popular tweets.

  • One data source i use a lot that i could make into a spread sheet is Blackboard. All the rows represent the different classes. But in the columns i would include, Course Name, CRN, Course ID, Professor, Grade, Major Course or Gen ED, and Area of Study.

  • One data driven source that I use is blackboard. If I were to construct an excel sheet for this; I would make my classes the rows and my grades as the columns. This would allow me to easily check my grades, without applying to much effort.

  • I use Amazon a lot. I imagine that the data sheet would have each one of my purchases as a row. From there, each column would be data about each of those purchases. Examples of the types of data that would be included are time of purchase, price, shipping-type, and the name of the distributor.

  • A data-driven service I use on a daily basis is eBay. The rows would consist of items I am currently interested in ( watching or bidding on) while the columns consists of prices range, shipping cost, product name, duration of when the item will end, or the location of the item.

  • The data-driven I use regularly Gruphub. A row would be restaurants that might I like. Some columns would be the type of the restaurant, the prices, how long will it take to be delivered and the location of the restaurant.

  • A data-driven service that I use is Amazon. If I were to create a spreadsheet for them, I would list the transaction numbers as the rows. For the columns, I would have the product name/type, the cost of the product, whether or not the customer was a Prime member, and where the product was being shipped from/to.

  • One data-driven source I use a lot is the grid on my TV. Rows could be names of the movies or shows I like, and columns could be the premises, genre, year made, cast, length, and sequels/prequels.

  • A data driven source I use is my TradeKing Brokerage account. I use this account to invest in different stocks and research quotes for potential stock purchases. Some of the columns I would have in an excel spreadsheet would be stock price, stock quantity if purchases, the day’s gain/loss for each stock, dividend distributions per share, and total gain/loss since purchase. Each row in the spreadsheet would list the full company’s name and ticker symbol.

  • A service that I use a lot is Amazon, if the data were stored in a spreadsheet the rows could be what the actual products are. The columns could include the price range, the category or type of product it is and the number of stars the product got out of five based on its reviews.

  • One data driven service that I use everyday is Spotify to listen to music. The rows would entail the artists, while the columns would be the albums, songs, instruments used, and genre.

  • One data-driven service I use daily is Venmo. The columns could be sender, receiver, date of the transaction, amount, and a short description. The row would be the individual transaction.

  • One data driven service I use on a regular basis is itunes. The columns or possibly a single column would consist of a specific artist/band, genre or category of music. Whereas the rows could consist of the name of a particular song, the artists featured on the song, the length of the song, and my rating of the song.

  • A data driven service that I use on a regular basis is Twitter. Twitter use a large variety of data to decide what tweets it wants to emphasize on certain users timeline’s. For instance, it could collect data on how often and how many tweets you have opened, liked, or retweeted from a particular user, and vice versa. If the numbers are high relative to other users, it will show this specific person’s tweet on a user’s “What you missed” portion of their timeline

  • A data-driven service that I use is grubhub. When it comes to storing the data for the service in the spread sheet, a row would be the zip code (that’s initially how users can narrow down what is close to them). The corresponding columns would be the type of food (Chinese, Italian, etc.), the name of the restaurant, $ signs to represent levels of cost ($ for inexpensive, $$$ for expensive).

  • A data-driven service that I use regularly is ESPN Fantasy Basketball. If I was putting this in Excel, I would use the rows for each player on my team. The columns would then be used for projected fantasy points per game, average fantasy points per game, total projected fantasy points for the season, and whether or not they had a game that day.

  • One Data-Driven service is credit karma. If i would make a spreadsheet it would consist of columns which is specific towards auto loans , school loans, and personal loans. The rows will show you the data from the loan, date it it was approve and terms.

  • A data driven service I use on a weekly basis is Tipsee which is an app that keeps track of your tips. The rows would represent the specific day worked while the columns would consists of tip amount, hours worked, and whether or not the tips were cash or on credit cards.

  • A data-driven service I use frequently is the Blaze Pizza app. The rows would include an order number, customer name, scheduled time of pickup, type of pizza, toppings, and special instructions. The data columns would be amount of pizzas ordered, hour and minute, and number of toppings.

  • For Facebook is would be time spent on the site, gender, time of days, commonly usef words and regions around the world.

  • A data-driven service that you use regularly is Facebook. To store the data for this service in a spreadsheet, the rows will consist of individual post in the feed. Some columns would be the name of the account that posted, the amount of likes/ types of reactions, amount of comments, time and date the post was published, and location.

  • I use ESPN fantasy a lot. In an excel spreadsheat, I could have the rows as divided teams and columns could be players and points.

  • A data driven service I use regularly is Amazon. If i were to store the data for that service in a spreadsheet each row could represent the name of the product that was purchased, and some columns could be the type of product, the amount of customer reviews, the price, and how many stars it was rewarded.

  • A data driven service I regularly use is Uber. If i were to have to store the data for the rides in a spreadsheet, each row would represent the trip I took, with the columns showing the price, miles traveled, and the destination.

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Office Hours
Laurel Miller (instructor) 11:00am-12:00pm, Tuesdays and Thursdays, Speakman Hall 210 or by appointment.
ITA information
Rebecca Jackson (ITA) By appointment only. Email: rebecca.jackson@temple.edu
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