Section 003, Instructor: Laurel Miller

Weekly Question #2: Complete by September 14

Leave your response as a comment on this post by the beginning of class on September 14. Remember, it only needs to be three or four sentences. For these weekly questions, I’m mainly interested in your opinions, not so much particular “facts” from the class!

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Here is the question (well, it’s not really a question):

Find a online article dated within last two weeks from a credible source that has something to do with data. It can be about the role of data or an interesting data-driven analysis. It should also be relevant to your major and of interest to you. Copy and paste the URL directly into your response followed by a few sentences that explain what is interesting about it.

You can use any of the sources under the “Great Data Sites” menu on the right sidebar of this page, or you can use any online news or magazine site.

47 Responses to Weekly Question #2: Complete by September 14

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/hurricane-harveys-impact-and-how-it-compares-to-other-storms/

    This article discusses Hurricane Harvey’s impact compared to other storms. I found it to be interesting because seeing visual representations of how each storm compares with others really puts into perspective how bad these storms are. For instance, Hurricane Katrina was the biggest and most destructive hurricane, whereas Hurricane Harvey luckily wasn’t as large and didn’t cause as many deaths, yet, they were the two highest costing storms of all. I feel like we think of the destruction caused by these storms but never how much was actually destroyed and how much it is going to cost to replenish what was lost. As an accounting major, I found that this article was relevant to me because of the comparison of financial aspects.

  • https://www.cbsnews.com/news/all-living-former-presidents-team-up-for-ad-on-harvey-relief/
    This article speaks on the latest ad launched by the former presidents of the U.S, Barack Obama, George W Bush, Bill Clinton, George H.W Bush and Jimmy Carter in an attempt to reach out to Americans to donate to relief efforts for Hurricane Harvey. I found this article interesting because it provides amounts of money presidents have contributed in order to help, the ad that was launched, as well as all the information needed to donate to the One America Appeal. As an Advertising major, I found this article to be relevant to me especially, because of the ad itself and the impact of having not just 1 former president but all five. By doing this they reach all audiences across America, with the hopes that when someone sees 1 president they really liked over the other four it may sway them to donate.

  • http://time.com/4930134/donald-trump-hurricane-harvey-donations/

    The data in this article shows how much money President Trump is donating to Hurricane Harvey relief, and where he is donating to. I found this interesting because as a Political Science major,I know that natural disasters can often be the black eye of a presidency. A president cannot control hurricanes or earthquakes, although he or she can fund climate change research to find out what is causing them, but they can donate to help. Donating, acknowledging the victims, and being supportive to the areas affected can really improve a president’s approval ratings. During Hurricane Katrina, former President George W. Bush failed to do these things, and was subsequently criticized by his constituents.

  • https://www.theguardian.com/money/datablog/2017/jan/06/tracking-the-cost-uk-and-european-commuter-rail-fares-compared-in-data
    This article describes the tracking costs workers spend on rail passes in the UK and Europe. The data in this article shows that traveling costs can cost as much as 14% of their wages for monthly rail passes. Data shows that the UK spends 10%-14% of their average monthly wages while other countries in Europe spend as little as 2% up to 7%. I found this article interesting as an accounting major because it deals with budgeting and tracking employees expenses on traveling to their sources of income. Although the percentages are high for traveling, it is better to spend only 14% of pay on transportation in order to get to your job. The workers can now allocate these percentages to their monthly income which will ultimately help them with their budget so they have enough money left for other expenses.

  • http://money.cnn.com/2017/09/07/technology/business/equifax-data-breach/index.html

    Over the past week a huge data breach occurred within the company Equifax. Equifax is a credit reporting agency in the USA. When the breach occurred, cyber criminals were able to access financial information such as credit card and social security numbers from over 140 million customers. In the article, security experts urge customers to continuously check their bank statements and credit card records. As an accounting major and a mis minor this article is particularly interesting to me because I plan on one day working within both the financial and cybersecurity field. This type of breach is a monumental data breach that will affect many people’s financial situation for years to come.

  • The url :https://www.informationweek.com/big-data/big-data-analytics/hurricanes-risk-analytics-in-a-world-of-uncertainty/d/d-id/1329816
    This article discusses about how all the data available regarding hurricane disasters were used to estimates the loss from the upcoming devastating Hurricane Irma. My major in Actuarial Science involved in creating models that can predict and estimates any scenario that can incur loss. Related to the article, actuaries used the data to estimates the potential loss from the Hurricane Irma. It is also interesting that even with the latest software, the article said that their estimates might not still that accurate as there are still outliers needed to be considered based on their past experience. All in all, data from past catastrophic event is still not enough to predict what might happen in the future.

  • http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/equifax-breach-exposes-143-million-people-identity-theft-49694776

    An interesting article I found online that deals with data is the Equifax data leak. Equifax is a large credit reporting company located in Atlanta Georgia. The hackers behind this stole significant personal data from 143 million Americans. With this data the hackers can commit malicious crimes such as identity theft using the information from stolen social security numbers, names, birthdays, and addresses. I found this article interesting because hacks like this can negatively affect people close to me and myself. This is related to my MIS major because in the future if I work for a financial firm like this my company will have to defend itself from major data breaches similar to this. Data breaches will continue to happen as long as there is something to steal.

  • https://philly.curbed.com/2017/8/25/16202456/made-in-america-philadelphia-labor-day-road-closures

    This article was created for anyone who was going to the Made In America Music Festival this past Labor Day Weekend. Made in America is a 2 day music festival curated by Jay-Z and Budweiser featuring the top artists of the most popular genres of music today. The article included information about streets that were going to blocked off for the two days, specified by different phases of the day, and for how long. The article also touched on directions to the Made In America site, including SEPTA Service Information for any schedule changes/detours. I chose this article because I love music and I go to Made In America every year.

  • https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/sep/09/apple-iphone-8-one-trillion-dollar-question
    This article has to do with Apple and a big week they have coming up. The iPhone 8 is scheduled to be released on September 12th, which could help Apple become the first trillion dollar company. A share price graph in the article shows how much Apple has progressed since January 2007 and how close they are from becoming the first trillion dollar company. As a supply chain management major, supply is always a concern when a new product is released but the company doesn’t seem worried.

  • https://www.si.com/fantasy-football-player-rankings-projections-2017

    Fantasy football just started last week along with the NFL season starting this Sunday. The way fantasy football works is that each player chooses a customized team of players to form their team. How each player does in actual games determines how the player will play in the fantasy games each week. This article is data driven because it gives projections of the fantasy football league based on player rankings and statistics about each player.

  • http://flowingdata.com/2017/08/28/occupation-matchmaker/
    This article is very interesting. It’s an analysis of who people tend/are more likely to marry based on their specific occupation. The article makes an interesting point that you’re more likely to marry people in your specific profession because those are the people you are exposed to most often. The article derives information from a survey given to married and unmarried couples. There’s a really cool and interactive graphic in the article too!

  • https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/08/technology/seriously-equifax-why-the-credit-agencys-breach-means-regulation-is-needed.html

    The article I found about data is from the New York Times regarding the recent Equifax data breach. This data breach is significant as financial information of as many as 143 million Americans has been leaked, including Social Security Numbers, names, birth dates, and more. As Equifax’s main function is to store the financial data of its’ customers, this hack is quite ironic; they failed at their one main job. This relates to my major, Information Science and Technology, as one of the large divisions of IST jobs is network and data security. Overall, this hack is quite troubling for a company whose main job is to protect their customers’ information.

  • http://flowingdata.com/2013/10/14/pizza-place-geography/

    This top of this article displays a map of the United States, and a key of the nine most dominant pizza chains in America. The point of the map is to show the nearest pizza place within a 10-mile radius across the United States. From a national perspective, Pizza Hut is the most dominant. Domino’s trails right behind it but lacks locations in the Midwest. Godfather’s is the most popular in the Midwest, while Papa John’s dominates the east central area, Papa Murphy’s dominates the northwest, and Little Caesar’s shows strength in Michigan and California. Although Chuck E Cheese’s has 557 locations across the united states, it does not compete with the other chains. I found this information relevant because it allows me to have a good understanding of which pizza place is closest to me, regardless of where I am in the United States.

  • https://www.cbsnews.com/news/equifax-data-breach-how-to-protect-your-credit-rating/

    This article was about the recent Equifax data breach, which resulted in leaked personal information such as, name, social security numbers, credit card numbers, and even license card numbers. The article gives helpful advice about how to go about using Equifax in the future and ways of protection against this happening again. They even have a section of what to never do, such as, use email as login and to also never log into account while being on a wireless hotspot. While this does not appear to my current major of philosophy, I do find this quite interesting being that I use to be a computer science major back at Moravian before I transferred, and it also is interesting being that I want to do corporate law and emphasizes how a hack can result in loss of personal information, resulting in lawsuits of the people towards the company.

  • The data is top jersey sales in the NFL. I think this is interesting because I love football, but it also cool to use the data in unique ways. Like what player is doing the best or is most popular based on the sale of their jersey. When Colin Kaepernick protested the national anthem his jersey sales dropped. It is cool how things happening in our society can impact consumers purchases.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/what-100-year-old-hurricanes-could-teach-us-about-irma/
    This article explains how looking at historical data of hurricanes. Most people think that the rise in climate and heat leads to stronger, more frequent hurricanes. However, looking at the last 100 years of hurricanes, there is actually no correlation between the two. In fact, the rise in water level makes hurricanes more likely to happen.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/what-100-year-old-hurricanes-could-teach-us-about-irma/

    This article above explains how the hurricanes form. It also tells us what we know about the article and how history could, in fact, be repeating its self. This article caught my attention because by knowing the statistics of the previous hurricanes it can tell us what to expect. The result of all this data makes it easier for scientists to spot climate change related patterns in the temperature. With this, it helps us know the information we need about hurricanes in the future.

  • http://flowingdata.com/2017/08/03/working-on-tips/
    This article highlights the ratio between wages and tips and showcases the disparity of tips across the US. As an Accounting major, I found this article particularly interesting for its economic aspects. It is common knowledge waiters and waitresses rely heavily on tips to sustain a living. It’s interesting to dive deep into the data and see just how much of an impact tips really make. Also from a tax standpoint, I’ve been curious as to how the IRS regulates this. One can be certain that not all tips are reported, and if they are, it is never the exact amount.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/what-100-year-old-hurricanes-could-teach-us-about-irma/
    This article describes ways to find the correlation between the increase in climate change and hurricanes getting stronger. They are wondering if there is any way that we can start gathering data on this correlation and if this can help us in the future. Some data that they found though however, is that scientists have found a way to take information from an echo produced by the ocean water. They found that water from hurricanes in the inlands, that will tell you when a hurricane hit an island and how long after another hurricane hit. As a risk management and insurance major, this article can be a really important finding as this can potentially reduce the amount of risk in certain areas by knowing where to put certain businesses or agricultural life. Knowing where hurricanes will hit will let people know where they should be going to build their life or their business and that will reduce the risk of a possible disaster. But, on the insurance side, it would be bad for people to know because insurance premiums for individuals that are currently in hurricane prone areas, will be very expensive.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/what-100-year-old-hurricanes-could-teach-us-about-irma/

    This articles discusses the impacts of hurricanes of the past. It talks about how scientists don’t know much about the causes of the hurricanes of today precisely because of the LACK of data about hurricanes in the past. Often times, hurricane databases would collect and tally hurricanes, but the form of collection would be flawed because it would not include every hurricane that hit the shore. Hurricane databases of the past would only record hurricanes that people have seen at sea, or ones that hit weather stations. It is hard to fill gaps in other aspects of environmental data, such as temperature or the impact of greenhouse gases in climate change,

  • https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-09-11/amazon-s-whole-foods-price-cuts-brought-25-jump-in-customers
    This article discusses the impact Amazon’s acquisition of Whole Foods has had on the price of their groceries, as well as on other grocery chains. Amazon bought Whole Foods for $13.7 billion and immediately began cutting prices “by as much as 43% on a range of items”. The article explains the buzz Amazon has brought to Whole Foods by comparing the chain to another popular supermarket, Kroger. One of the statistics the article highlights is the 35% increase in shoppers in Chicago locations. Whole Foods is making drastic changes and its influence is being felt by local and already existing supermarkets across the country.

  • https://www.theguardian.com/inequality/datablog/2017/jul/17/which-countries-most-and-least-committed-to-reducing-inequality-oxfam-dfi

    The article I found tittled, “Which countries are the most (and least) committed to reducing inequality?” focused on providing data that shows countries that are either the most or the least committed to reducing inequality. The article talks about how measuring this information can be complex, so in order to do it accurately they needed to look at three key factors relating to to inequality such as spending on health, education and social protection, progressive structure and incidence of tax and labour market policies
    to address inequality. Within the article, it lists the top 5 for most and least of each key factor and provides a visual representation as well which makes it more helpful to understand what countries are involved and where they are located as well.

  • http://flowingdata.com/2017/09/11/most-female-and-male-occupations-since-1950/
    So this article talks about, how jobs have evolved and changed within genders since 1960 to today. It talks about how decades ago females typically stayed home while the male went and worked. There is also mention about how some occupations are more manly and some are more feminine. For example, you would see a male doctor and a female nurse. Over time there was a huge shift in occupations between 1950-2015 ages ranging from 16-64, as in many occupations were now more female as opposed to male occupations. I found this to be interesting because when you are in STEM major, there are STILL many disagreements about which gender should be where career wise. So, this article really does perfectly describe the drastic change since the 1950s when it comes to careers.

  • http://flowingdata.com/2017/09/11/most-female-and-male-occupations-since-1950/
    This article is about female and male occupations since 1950 till 2015. The ages range from 16 to 64. There’s tons of data that is shown in this article. You can see how not many women worked in 1950, but now around 70% of both women and men are employed. There is also a graph that shows bubbles of jobs; the bigger the bubble, the more common the job. Men are on the right side while women are on the left, and the bubbles in the middle show there’s equally amount of both men and women that have that job. I am a business major and most of the bubbles in the center relate to some type of career in the business field.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/americas-shifting-religious-makeup-could-spell-trouble-for-both-parties/

    This article is about how America’s shifting religious makeup could affect both the Republican and Democratic party. The first reason i found this interesting is because i am a Political Science major and this could have monumental effects on political campaigning within the coming years. I also found this interesting as a Catholic, because even during Church i noticed there were frequently less “younger” people attending. But i did not realize, or even think, about how it could affect political gain for each party. I also found it interesting, when the article pointed out that the Democrats will have so many people to please that it is inherently challenging, With such a change in the political expectations within this past election, the role of religion seems to be the next major change to come.

  • http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/lawsuits-gestures-customers-equifax-data-breach-49805055
    This article is about the recent data breach from Equifax (a collection agency). This article is interesting because we talked about other data breaches in class and this one is very recent. Equifax is receiving new lawsuits after releasing social security numbers of over 143 million Americans. State and Federal authorities are investigating.The breach makes me question if there really is privacy. As an actuarial science major, I will also be working with people’s private information in order to create insurance rates. I hope the data I will be using will stay private for everyone’s sake.

  • http://www.football-data.co.uk/englandm.php

    This article has everything you need to know about every English soccer game from 1993-2017. The data sets are broken down between seasons as well as between the different leagues each game is played in. There is a free downloadable link that you can click on for each individual year’s league which will take you into an Excel spreadsheet with so much information regarding each game played, including the two teams names, the date the games were played, the referee’s name, and so much more. I chose this article because I really love playing soccer and have played most of my life, including playing for the women’s club team here at Temple.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/irma-is-bearing-down-on-some-of-floridas-most-vulnerable-residents/
    This article is about how Hurricane Irma affected some of the most vulnerable people in Florida. The article describes three populations that were greatly affected by the superstorm: migrant workers, those living in mobile homes, and those 65 and older. The article is interesting because it uses data to analyze which parts of Florida are most heavily populated with people falling under these categories. In some areas more than 40% of the population lives in mobile homes that are weak and could be heavily impacted by the storm. Similarly, the article talks about how the population of 65 and older in Florida is higher than in any other state (almost 20%). Using this data, the state government of Florida and first responders can pinpoint what areas they should most heavily advocate for mandatory evacuation in the future and which areas they should go to first to help those in need.

  • http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/football/ct-hurricane-irma-nfl-tv-ratings-20170911-column.html
    The article I found builds on the dropping NFL ratings and how hurricane Irma may have affected that. Last year the NFL suffered from a huge drop in ratings and they hope to recover but after the inaugural game of the season, they are still trending down. This may have been because of hurricane Irma because over two million people were watching coverage of the hurricane during the Chiefs and Patriots game Thursday night. It will be interesting to see how the ratings pan out over this season, the sport Goliath known as the NFL may be declining.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/students-at-most-colleges-dont-pick-useless-majors/
    This article takes a look at a common criticism thrown at many millennials in higher education, that they are wasting their money on “useless” degrees. “Useless” could be easily defined as less practical majors that provide students with careers that pay less than it cost them to get the degree in the long run. However, after analysis it seems that students overwhelmingly are enrolled in practical and “useful” majors, and that it is often how selective the school is that determines ones success within paying off their degree. This seems logical as most people desire to get into more selective schools and supports what I have anecdotally seen in my time here at temple, most people are highly interested in getting a good paying job when it’s all over and aren’t here to waste money.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/a-college-football-teams-season-isnt-over-at-0-1/

    This article talks about how a college football team who starts its season 0-1 still has a solid chance at making the College Football Playoff. In week one of the season, Florida State (number 3 team in the country) lost to the number one seed Alabama Crimson Tide; a brutal matchup to start the season. Florida State lost, but according to the data collected in the article, the Seminoles season is not over. The article takes all the one loss teams from 1998-2016 and sees what week their one loss came from (12 week schedule). Then it compares all the teams that finished in the top four to those who did not for each individual week loss. What the data shows is the earlier you get your loss out of the way the better your chance of still competing for a national championship.

  • https://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2017/aug/22/how-much-do-abortions-cost-across-australia-explainer

    This article is talking about the dilemma of legal abortion in Australia. Campaigns for easier access to abortion in Australis can make the law have changed, but abortion still too hard to help those women who are homeless or low income. the point is the high price for the abortion. The cost of an abortion varies according to state, location, the method of termination and gestation. In Australis, the price range is 500-800 Australi dollars. After the first trimester, costs increase significantly.

  • https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/09/01/upshot/cost-of-hurricane-harvey-only-one-storm-comes-close.html
    This article shows the cost of Hurricane Harvey. While it is too early to know the exact number, experts predict it will cost somewhere between $72-$108 billion. This is interesting because there is also another graph in the article that shows the amount of billion dollar disasters since 1980. As the years have passed, the amount of billion dollar disasters has drastically increased. Some are saying that this graph speaks on the fact that climate change is real and that the number of these billion dollar disasters is only going to keep increasing.

  • https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/sep/12/america-income-high-census-2016-obama-recession
    This article shows growth in the American Economy. The data shows that households are making more money every year. Also shows that poverty is on a decline. It’s interesting because we have reached record peaks with a president a lot of people dislike and say had little impact. He has data behind him to show he is a big part of the climb out of the previous recession we experienced even although he was years after it. Another thing is that more and more Americans have health insurance and that also has data behind it. Im in between a major in finance or economics so the article headline drew me right to it.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/amazingly-the-indians-are-even-better-than-they-seem/
    Here’s an article about the 2017 Cleveland Indians who are currently dominating the American baseball world. The article talks about how the team may be even better than we thought. Obviously a team that has won 21-games in a row is very impressive, but the article goes deeper in breaking down how they may be even better than we think. The article mentions how luck has not been on the Indians side. In terms of rankings per different categories in the AL as compared to the 2002 “Moneyball” Oakland Athletics, they blow them out of the water. All this goes to show is that having a big win streak isn’t the only way to evaluate a team.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/irma-is-bearing-down-on-some-of-floridas-most-vulnerable-residents/

    So I am a Marketing major with a MIS minor so anything with data will be in my field. I read this really interesting article at fivethirtyeight about how Hurricane Irma will affect some of the most vulnerable residents in Florida. Those vulnerable residents are referred to as elder and poor people. It was just very interesting that they analyzed where these types of residents lived.

  • http://www.journalism.org/2017/09/07/news-use-across-social-media-platforms-2017/
    I am a Media Studies and Production major so I chose an article on news use across social media platforms in 2017. I found this article interesting because it shows how many adults in the United States use social media to get their news as opposed to reading a newspaper or watching the news on TV. It also shows that over half of Americans over the age of 50 get their news from social media sites as well. This is somewhat surprising because this age group did not grow up using Facebook, Twitter, and other social media sites but they are clearly making the switch of how they get their news.

  • http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/08/24/5-facts-about-student-loans/

    Here is an interesting article which i found online talking about some phenomenon of the student loan in the America. The data which based on a Pew Research Center analysis shows the students graduates with student loan are more possible to have a second job and report struggling financially than others who graduates without loans. Another interesting facts which the data shows, according to the different degrees, the amount of students owe are varies widely, the higher degree, the more loan borrowed. As a finance major student, the headline of hte article interests me a lot. This article can give me some inspiration If i could work for a lending institution or bank in the future.

  • https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2017/09/data-protection-measure-removed-california-values-act
    Here is an interesting article about data protection that has been revoked in the state of California. After the recent election, a rights group helped construct a bill that protects data collected by the government in regards to immigrants and does not allow this data to be used for deportations and religious registries. This bill was to stop federal immigration authorities from using data collected by California law enforcement. This however was cut from the final bill due to negotiations between the California state senate. The bill still protects immigrants in other ways however their data rights are up in the air

  • https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/sep/07/equifax-credit-breach-hack-social-security

    I found an interesting article about the Equifax credit hack that happened last week. The hack exposed the SSN of 143 million Americans and the personal information like birthdates, addresses, and credit card numbers. This is very sensitive information because they can destroy peoples’ identities with this kind of data they possess. This information was stolen from about 60% of adults in America, I found it interesting because who knows if anyone in our class was part of that data breach. This makes it scary that literally nothing is safe out there. Hackers can get to anything.

  • https://www.securitycommunity.tcs.com/infosecsoapbox/articles/2017/08/23/bitcoin-under-attack

    This article deals with bitcoin and how it is potentially getting some inferences of being subjected to being attacked. This article interests me because I personally have stock in Bitcoin and I fear if they get attacked or hacked lots of money could be lost. This applies to data by giving the visual images of how the operation systems work and how/where an attack can come from and how they could divert it or put a stop to it.

  • https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/sep/08/why-do-big-hacks-happen-blame-big-data
    This article talks about Big Data and how detrimental it can be when the wrong people get their hands on it. I am an MIS major, so this has very much to do with my major and I am fascinated with Big Data because it is the future of business. What was interesting about this article is that it states the idea that the amount of data that companies can collect should be limited because they keep getting hacked, and all this information keeps getting into the wrong hands. It then goes on to list some examples of big hacks over that past few years. One of the last interesting things I read in the article was that the more we allow these companies to collect data, the worse the hacks are gonna become. Advanced cybersecurity is not enough anymore.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/surviving-a-big-storm-doesnt-mean-the-trauma-is-over/

    This article discusses the unpredictable effects that disasters such as hurricanes can have on the mental health of survivors. A study after Hurricane Katrina showed that reports of headaches and migraines among the population affected increased from 19% to 56% within 19 months after the storm. Chernobyl is also used as an example; stating that while it was estimated that only approximately 4000 people’s lives would be affected by exposure to high levels of radiation, nearly all of the 350,000 who were displaced believed that their lives would be shortened because of the public stigma around the accident. This stigma resulted in much higher rates of depression, alcoholism, and other mental health issues among survivors of Chernobyl than the general population.

  • http://flowingdata.com/2017/09/11/most-female-and-male-occupations-since-1950/ This article discusses the situation back in 1950 back when women work at home, and how things change after year 2015

  • URL: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/09/170905145548.htm
    This article settles the debate between cell phone use and neurological problems in children. As we learn more about the technology around us, many people create ideas that this technology, radioactive waves in particular, are harmful to our mind and bodies. This research shows no support of the hypothesis that the effects on child’s language, communication and motor skills is due to the use of mobile phones during pregnancy. This article is relevant to my major because as communication studies major, technology is a huge part about how we communicate with each other and mobile devices are where we see most of our advertisements for businesses throughout the day. When people start fearing that their cell phones will create neurological problems in their children, they will be hesitant to continue using their phones and advertisers will lose viewers of their ads and therefore have less people buying their products or services.

  • https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/02/opinion/the-health-data-conundrum.html
    This Article is about the recent hacking of thousands of health records, by cyber criminals. which has become very valuable to them more so than any other data. Allowing them to use this information to obtain medical equipment and drugs to resell. They are also able to fraudulently bill these insurance companies that consumers have to pay for.

  • https://theasc.com/blog/the-film-book/monumental-intimacy-the-experience-of-amp-lt-i-amp-gt-dunkirk-amp-lt-i-amp-gt

    This article is about one of the biggest films in this year. It is about the film Dunkrick, by Benjamin B. I’m a film major student, so these article are really interested to me. The writer talked about the experience of the film. He also mentions how the film had been shot and which different cameras did the director used to shoot it. Benjamin also evaluated the film in terms of visual storytelling and how the director makes the image speaks other than using dialogue to deliver his missage.

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Office Hours
Laurel Miller (instructor) 1:00-2:00pm, Tuesdays and Thursdays, Speakman Hall 207F or by appointment.
ITA information
Rebecca Jackson (ITA) By appointment only. Email: rebecca.jackson@temple.edu