Data Analytics – Section 1

Weekly Question

Hi – here’s your weekly question – it’s due the Monday we return from Spring Break, but please feel free to get it done before you go off and do something fabulous for the week!

Remember, it only needs to be three or four sentences. For these weekly questions, I’m mainly interested in your opinions, not so much particular “facts” from the class!If you sign in using your AccessNet ID and password you won’t have to fill in the name, email and captcha fields when you leave your comment.

Here is the question:

Consider the best practices for data visualizations we discussed in class. Take a look at two infographic sites: The Daily Infographic and Cool Infographics. Find a graphic that does a nice job of telling a story. Post a link to the graphic and explain why you think it’s an example of a good data visualization.

46 Responses to Weekly Question

  • I found an infographic that discusses the perfect design elements and considerations for a company or organization logo. I think that there are so many ways why this is a great graphic. First off, it’s useful. At some time in each of our lives we will need to create a logo… whether for work or for our personal digital identities. And this graphic has some great tips for helping with that process. Second, it’s easy to follow. There are distinct sections which all flow logically down the graphic… it is hard to get lost and each section stays on task. Lastly, it’s relevant and references examples that we are all familiar with. By using real-world examples to prove the points the graphic attempts to make, the graphic has a bigger and more long lasting impression on our lives.

    http://www.dailyinfographic.com/the-recipe-for-the-perfect-logo

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/the-internet-of-yesterday-vs-today-infographic

    “The Internet of Yesterday vs. Today”

    I find this graphic to be a great example of a good data visualization for several reasons. First off, the topic is interesting and all of the colors complement each other, making the graphic easy on the eyes to read. Second, It displays meaningful comparisons on how the internet looked in the past vs. the present by making the background identical to how it really looked in their respective time periods. In addition to that, the data is conveniently placed there, which maximizes the graphics effect to tell a meaningful story through it’s comparison. Lastly, the references for the data used in the graphic by the creator can be easily found.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/the-recipe-for-the-perfect-logo
    This is a good example of data visualization because the topic is helpful and provides clear images to make it an easy read for those looking to create a logo. Use of successful logos from recognizable companies such as Apple and Nike make the viewer trust the information being provided. Headings with simple directions also keep the info graphic concise.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/wheres-all-the-water-going
    “Where’s all the Water Going?”
    I think this infographic does a great job of telling the story because it gives a great visual for understanding what happens to what and how much is needed for our normal daily processes. For example, they use easily understood objects/foods like a slice of bread or a glass of wine. In addition, they make the droplets of water in the infographic bigger or smaller depending on which object requires more water. It gets my attention, is easy to read, tells a great story, and informs me of a trend.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/what-not-to-do-as-a-tourist
    This infographic is great because it is simple and easy to read. It does not have any unnecessary data ink therefore it is not cluttered with other information. The colors are eye catching and it is keen to the eye.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/tornadoes-infographic-980×1268-640×848.jpg

    This is an example of good data visualization because it represents the amount of tornadoes very well with the color difference in the states as well as the numbers in the states. The semi circle that shows the amount of tornadoes deaths every year is the only things about this that could have been done better.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/6a00e54ee3905b883301910466eb21970.png

    This infographic tells a nice story about why it’s important to invest in good customer service practices. It is an example of good data visualization because it uses colors that both differentiate each section from one another, but all go well together. The text is in a clear & easy to read format, and the pictures are colorful and assist in telling the story the data and text are telling. Ultimately, the infographic is easy to read and understand.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/is-your-startup-idea-taken
    “Is Your Idea Taken?”
    This is infographic is relatively comprehensive and is ripe with relevant information. What it does is it notes everyday activities on the right side, and popular apps (Uber, Tinder, AirBnb, Birchbox) and it visualizes if there is a company that combines the two. This is great infographic because it is easy to understand, and relays a plethora of relevant data to the user.

  • http://www.freehold-sale.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/londons-expected-house-price-gain-infographic-freehold-sale.png

    This graphic has much detail and explains through a couple different graphs how the prices of homes in different regions of London will or have risen. The first graph catches my eye through the use of colors to signify which regions have a high or low price range. The next section involves a more detailed description of each region like name, percent, and a quick excerpt explaining the price jump. This part acted almost like a detailed legend that helps the viewer better understand the graphic of London. There’s also a table that shows which type of property experienced the biggest/least jump from September 2014 to September 2015.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/what-are-the-hardest-languages-to-learn-infographic
    What are the Hardest Languages to Learn?
    This infographic does a great job telling a story. The graphic is organized well and has a lot of relevant and helpful information. From showing an outline of the country on a map, showing the real pronunciation of a language, and telling readers how many people speak the language, this infographic would definitely be useful for someone looking to pick up a new language. I especially liked how it explained what made the harder languages harder for native English speakers to learn.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/blockbusters-and-the-bottom-line-harry-potter-vs-twilight

    This infographic is an example of good data visualization due to its sensible scaling/comparisons, clarity, and comprehensiveness. The infographic uses quantity colored to illustrate comparisons in gross profit, market cap, company profit, etc., and the amount colored in comparison to the numbers is sensible and standardized. One company’s market cap roughly half the size of the other company’s is not tiny in comparison – it’s roughly half the size of the other company’s. The category titles are easy to read and understand, and the red and blue colors are easy to distinguish from one another.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/student-loan-debt-americas-next-bubble-to-burst
    I found this infographic intriguing in telling the narrative of how student loan debt in America is spiraling out of control. The information is presented in a logical manner, with the first two layers showing the true scope of the problem before the third layer proposes possible solutions. Lastly, the colors used focuses the message with green being the color of money and black and blue complementing nicely.

  • I found this info-graphic on Bitcoin and world finance on dailyinfographic.com: http://www.dailyinfographic.com/bitcoin-2015s-best-performing-currency
    I choose this info-graphic because of how accurately and visually it describes how bitcoin is on the rise. The graphic does a wonderful job in illustrating how bitcoin is growing, as well as how it compares to other currency’s and why to keep your eye on it. It also follows most of all the rules we talked about in class and does a beautiful visual job in describing its performance as a currency.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/life-hacks-vs-hangovers-infographic
    This infographic was interesting and I felt that it did a great job of illustrating how one can avoid a hangover. The light colors were balanced with pictures and text. I think it is a great example of an infographic because if there was no text, one could make inferences on the point that the creator was trying to get across. In the end, the best way to avoid a hangover is to stay sober!

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/first-signs-you-should-not-accept-that-job
    “First signs you should not accept that job” infographic says a lot about a company and why a person should not apply or accept the offer. The colors were not obnoxious, the text was not too small or wordy. Even the animated pictures were useful. It easily explained why a candidate should not work at a certain place by the signs and hints given by the employer and employees. Definitely using these useful tips when searching and interviewing for a job.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/what-are-the-hardest-languages-to-learn-infographic
    The infographic successfully depicts the level of difficulty of learning foreign languages for native English speakers. The graphic shows the complexity of the languages, the number of class hours needed to become proficient, and displays the number of native speakers in the world relative to the nation in descending order. This graphic uses a donut chart representing a full year and is shaded to depict the number of weeks, as a percentage of the year, required to attain language proficiency. The infographic is neat, clear and easy to interpret, it uses different colors to separate the difficulty to make each one distinct. This graphic was easy to interpret without even checking the chart keys.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/millenials-at-work
    “Millennials at Work”
    I am using this infographic not only because of it’s clear data visualization, but because it is also relevant to today’s society. This infographic focuses on the percentage of millennials who have a certain opinion about their own group of peers. Everything from the colors, the amount of text, the focus, the percentages, and the depictions all work well together. I was also surprised to see that 66% of millennials believe that employers should limit social media in order to make our peers more productive.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/beercoffee-640×1960.png

    This infographic explains the effects coffee and beer have on one’s brain and behavior. I like this because it uses that relationship to tell a story of how one can use beer to be creative and coffee to focus on implementing the creativity. The infographic represents this story in an easy-to-read way by splitting the image into sections and fun topics. It is simple and gets its point across very easily.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/american-startup-facts-for-2015
    I thought that this info-graphic successfully depicted a full spectrum of information centralized around start-up companies in America. The info-graphic shows in depth data analysis regarding everything from the most popular cities for American start-ups, the most popular industries for American start-ups, and even the top 10 words primarily used in their company names. The graphic utilizes a combination of bar graphs, pie charts, bullet-ed percentage lists, and even a national geographic map overlay to fully and clearly illustrate to the audience the crucial facts pertaining to the topic. The graphic does not use unnecessary distracting colors, patterns or images. Instead the graphics are simple and to the point which makes it easier to interpret and understand to anyone looking at the info-graphic even at a glance without reading the legend key.

  • http://www.freehold-sale.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/londons-expected-house-price-gain-infographic-freehold-sale.png
    I thought that this was a good infographic because it has a colorful consistent color scheme. The color goes from dark green, representing the lowest percentage for price, and then transition to red, representing the highest percentage for price. There color choice also makes sense because the higher the price the more intense the transition of red. The font and size of the percentage is also clear and apparent.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/whats-your-wine-personality

    This infographic does a good job of making its topic clear from the beginning. The burgundy color of the wine bottle and wine glass relates closely to the theme. Additionally, each of the section is formatted in the same way with the same type of content, and consumes an equal amount of space. But infographic for content such as this is easier to make because there are not statistics and graphs that can cause confusion. The information is pretty straight forward: a picture of a typical person in that age group; age and occupation underneath the image; next to the picture is the type of wine for that person. Then a short description of that type of person with 3-4 hobbies are juxtaposed either to the left or to right of the picture. Information jumps off the page instead of readers having to look for information.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/budget-grocery-shopping-for-college-students

    This infographic does a nice job of giving college students tips on how to save money while on a budget, in addition to other suggestions for student who want to stay healthy. It numbers each tip which makes the graphic easy to follow. The infographic also shows data which can be used to prove certain points that the creator is trying to make. By showing this data, it can easily be used to convince the target demographic–college students– that these are successful, worthwhile tips. I would also suggest this infographic to any college student who is on a budget and would like to save some money here and there.

  • This info-graphic about the rise of fantasy football does great job with using data and graphs to illustrate to the viewer how fantasy football is on its way to having an expected value than the actual sport itself. The infographic uses several displays all in which have there own distinct classification to decipher and understand whats going on. The artist does well with giving the data color and being able to tell what the data is representing with succinct descriptions either next to or under it.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/what-not-to-do-as-a-tourist

    I like how neatly and clearly the information is on this info-graphic. The information it wants to clearly tell us is stated on the top with a visible header of “what not to do as a Tourist”. Followed by that are pretty much two columns with one stating what not to do and the other stating what to do instead. To top this off, and to avoid confusion as to why or why not certain things are not supposed to be done, they have put a mini bubble in between the columns to explain why the tourists are not recommended to do as so. It has simple and clear information that is not confusing to read at all and that is what I like from this info-graphic.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/the-netflix-effect-how-streaming-is-killing-cable
    “The Netflix Effect: How Streaming is Killing Cable”
    I liked this graphic because it visually represented an interesting topic very well. It made good use of appropriate symbols to represent different topics, good choices in color and contrast to separate the different points on it, and its graphs were very effective in getting its points across.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/are-we-heading-for-a-diabetes-apocalypse

    I think that this graphic is a great example of an excellent graph. It is easy to read and the title and images at the top and throughout the graph really makes it stand out and make you want to analyze it even more. Sentences and data are short and easy to read. Easy to see what types there are and how it is caused

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/is-this-justice

    I liked this graphic that gave the reader several interesting facts about the US prison system. There are many facts all cleverly displayed in different styles that are pleasing to the eye and not repetitive. There are a nice mixture of words, numbers and pictures that coordinate well with one another. Finally, there is a theme for coloring and it is constant, not too crazy and not too bland.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/consumers-and-the-connected-car
    I liked this graph because it clearly explained the adoption of connected cars. It is very easy to see data, such as, unfamiliarity by demographic up to most requested features. There is a nice flow to the graph which makes it attractive to a reader to analyze the information given.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/your-brain-on-beer-vs-coffee-infographic
    I thought that this infographic was interesting because it showed how your brain reacts to drinking beer vs coffee. The graphics and color schemes did a good job of showing distinction between the two drinks. The beer graphic was an orange tone and the coffee graphic was a dark brown color, which is simple for anyone to understand. I also liked the face graphics that showed the emotions how a person drinking a particular substance would feel.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/hone-your-chops-a-chefs-guide-to-knives

    This graphic does good job in data visualization. This knife graphic uses lots of graphic elements as “spiral”–represent different types of chef’s knife and specific parts for materials, “camber”–focus on the chop skill and dice precise. This graphic also uses clear titles, fonts and sizes to differ steps. From the names of parts of knife to the lingo for chopping, readers would know how to hold the knife in right way, or they would learn chopping is also a skill in cooking. Readers would have strongly visual experiences without data comparison.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/the-power-of-visual-communication
    This is a great graph for three reasons. First, the graph’s format is really consistent, which makes readers easy to follow the information or to find the information they need. Second, there are not too many words in the graph, which gives the graph a “breath space” and makes the readers feel comfortable when they read the graph. Third the graph appropriately uses related icons to deliver certain messages to the readers, which makes reader much easier to understand the intend messages.

  • http://www.coolinfographics.com/blog/2016/2/16/londons-expected-house-price-gain.html

    The graphic regarding the prices of London homes stood out to me primarily due to the way the graphic flows and draws in the reader. What makes a good graphic is the goal of retaining the audience’s attention and making them truly withdraw the data from the graphic. For instance, if the graphic had no color, was unorganized, and/or was difficult to analyze then it would defeat the purpose of making a visualization for the data. The graphic is great because rather than throwing an ugly spreadsheet up, the data is put into a visually appealing and easily retained graphic.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/is-your-startup-idea-taken
    This infographic is great because it is simple and easy to read. It is simple on the eyes. It is not messy, it is more organized. The slot with the different color indicate what is available and what’s not available, something that helps the graph to be easily understood.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/how-quitting-smoking-changes-your-body_545aab0346ef3_w900-2.jpg

    This graphic explains the process over time how quiting smoking cigarettes affects our bodies. To begin with, I really liked how they associated the colors of the time periods to the body parts that they are referring to. It becomes easier to relate and better understand what they are talking about. Also, I realized they started with the color red and ended with blue, I think it shows how the body transformed to a better stage (blue). Overall, I really liked how simple and self explanatory it is, and the colors that make it more attractive that I think is perfect to be used for a presentation.

  • Find a graphic that does a nice job of telling a story. Post a link to the graphic and explain why you think it’s an example of a good data visualization.

    http://www.coolinfographics.com/blog/2016/2/11/power-hungry-the-rise-fall-of-electricity-consumption.html

    This infographic is very informative on the average household energy consumption throughout the past century. The graphics are clear on their own and does not really require text to understand the gist of the graphic. The timeline helps you understand the technological progress made in this time which is something you can infer on. There are meaningful comparisons between the different time periods which show the differences in energy consumption and even consumer tastes.

  • The graphic I chose is the Youtube one http://blog.pexe.so/content/images/2015/12/youtube-stats-fin-1.jpg

    I chose this graphic because the 3 pieces of information it is displaying all have little pictures that really indicate what is being talking about it. The number of uploads is represented by a little film strip, the upload time has a clock and lastly the data has a little piece of a graph. The information is also presented in descending order. This graphic does a great job of presenting its information in a clear, simple, and easy to interpret way.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/your-brain-on-beer-vs-coffee-infographic
    I really like this infographic because it has a logical mixture of pictures and illustration. The information the picture is telling can be a little bit boring, but something that a college student would like to know. It is good how at the top the different liquids in the brain show exactly where the chemicals change the brain chemistry. It is also effective because of the side by side comparison. The picture shows the same information for both coffee and beer at the same time which makes contrasting the two easier. I like how the end wraps up the information in case the reader was too lazy to read all of the words in between.

  • http://www.coolinfographics.com/blog/2016/2/16/londons-expected-house-price-gain.html
    This infographic is a great example of data visualization. It clearly says in the title what story is being told. The first map uses colors from green to red to show the increase in house prices, red being the largest gain and green being the smallest. Under the large map is a breakdown of countries and exact percentages for more precise information. This example of data visualization clearly depicts the information in a way that is easily read and understood.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/the-cost-of-love-not-all-relationships-are-created-equal-this-valentines-day

    This graphic shows a great story about the differences of expenses and behaviors of men and women and society on and around Valentine’s Day. This is a great graphic because it tells a compelling story which many people can relate to. It is easy on the eyes which grab the person’s attention. The color theme of the infographic alone helps with the visual because it ties with the information visually. The whole infographic shows a meaningful comparison between the two sexes and also shows how society as a whole “change” around Valentine’s Day.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/millenials-at-work
    This graphic shows millenials at work: how they spend the 9 to 5 day at work, how loyal they are and how their work ethics is. I find the graph very helpful and very easy to understand. The graph uses percentages to show what millenials do what work, uses different color fonts and different size fonts to attract the reader to the most important part of the graph. It also uses different small icons to attract the reader and makes the graph more interesting and easier to read and understand.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/why-smiling-is-so-contagious
    This is a good inforgraph because it discusses what the affect smiling not only does to you but to everyone around you. It relieves stress, puts you in a better mood, and also puts everyone else around you in a better mood. The graphic gives statistics about what smiling can do to your body and also to others. It also gives visuals of what smiling and not smiling can do to others.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/15-productivity-hacks-for-college-students
    This inforgraph tells a great story because it has a lot of visuals. It also have very great tips for college students like myself. The color scheme is also really appealing and it is very simple and straight to the point.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/the-recipe-for-the-perfect-logo

    I thought this infographic was very effective in explaining the consistency of a great logo. The wording was kept minimal, and the author used pictures to better explain his points. Overall, the simplicity of the infograph allowed for the information to be absorbed quickly.

  • http://www.dailyinfographic.com/a-guide-to-pet-vaccines
    I thought this was a good infographic because the images really supported what the text was saying. They images also made the text more understandable. For each type of pet vaccine, the graphic gave a timeline for when your pet should get it which was something that I liked. The vaccine guide is very straight forward and used minimal words which is why it is effective.

  • http://blog.revolutionanalytics.com/2014/09/google-uses-r-to-calculate-roi-on-advertising-campaigns.html

    In this article it’s stated that Google has used R as well as release a new package for R. This new package that they’ve created enables them to take a look at the effects of an advertising campaign on website clicks. The info graphic used shows the return on investment that has been received after sending out an advertising campaign. It is very simple and displays the data so that it is easily read by someone who is not entirely familiar with the data.

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