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Jay-Z picture

Jay-Z

Credit by: CDXNetwork

1. Mobb Deep – Shook Ones Part II

Mobb Deep – Shook Ones Part II

Uploaded by EnigmaticxFusion

Mobb Deep’s ‘Shook Ones Part II’ record is from their The Infamous album, which was produced in 1995. Havoc from Mobb Deep produced the record, and also is the main producer on the album. Havoc sampled Herbie Hancock’s ‘Jessica.’ Havoc tells Complex.com the process of making ‘Shook Ones Part II’ record:

I made that beat inside my mother’s house in Queensbridge. That house gave me a lot of inspiration because something could happen outside and I could go upstairs and make a beat. Like, I would have this feeling like, ‘Let me go upstairs and make a beat of how I’m feeling right now.’ So I just popped the sample up and I almost even erased it because I didn’t even really like it too much. [Laughs.] At that time I was always in the house alone by myself making beats and sometimes if i didn’t have somebody to co-sign it I’d be like, ‘**** it, whatever.’ But then my friends were like, ‘Nah, this s*** is ******* crazy.’ So I kept it. Thank God because we probably wouldn’t be here right now if I had erased that.

The sample appears at the 0:23 mark of the record and throughout.

Herbie Hancock – Jessica

Uploaded by MusicForYourFunk

Herbie Hancock created ‘Jessica’ in 1969 for his Fat Albert Rotunda album. The sample is taken at the 0:03 mark of the record.

Mobb Deep – Shook Ones Part II sample Herbie Hancock

Uploaded by latadezinc

I found a cool video showing the Hancock’s ‘Jessica’ sample slowly building into the ‘Shook Ones Part II’ record. There has been a mystery behind the sample Havoc used for ‘Shook Ones Part II’ for the last 16 years. The LA Times recently figured out the sample last year. Havoc tells Complex.com the mystery behind the sample:

[The LA Times only recently figured out the sample] because I used such a small part of a record. And I chopped it up and shifted the tempo a lot, so I put them on the keyboard. I made it faster, then made it slower. People were like, ‘What the **** is that? What record does that come from?’ because so many producers, they blatantly use a sample. I can’t say there’s no creativity to it, but it’s nothing to figure out.

Given that ‘Shooks Ones Pt. II” is a classic record, it just brought the curiosity out like,’What ******* sample is that?’ [Laughs.] And I’m not telling anybody what sample it was because I forgot what samples I used. [Laughs.] But that is definitely the sample because I remembered when they brought it out. [Laughs.] But that’s a secret between you and me. It’s good and it’s bad because I was reveling in the mystery of the sample, but if people wanted to know so bad then that just shows how much love people have for the track.

2. Wu-Tang – C.R.E.A.M.

Wu-Tang – C.R.E.A.M.

Uploaded by BVMUndergroundHipHop

Wu-Tang Clan’s ‘C.R.E.A.M.’ (Cash Rules Everything Around Me) record is from their Enter the Wu-Tang (36 chambers) album, which was produced in 1993. RZA from Wu-Tang produced the record, and the rest of the album. RZA sampled The Charmels’s ‘As Long as I’ve Got You.’ Alchemist, a producer, comments on the production of Wu-Tang’s ‘C.R.E.A.M.’ record (The Alchemist’s comments I found on wutang-corp.com):

RZA looped that was something so simple. But that song was so classic and when you find the sample, you are like “Damn all he did was loop it and put some drums to it.” But that was the magic of the music. I always remember that as sometimes you find a loop… and it is so crazy. It is not about how much you do to it sometimes, it is about making a really classic record. But then you have to respect it when someone chops up a sample and does it differently, I do that a lot too. But at the same time I will chop it to pieces and you will say you can’t believe I did that, but then I will just loop up a record too as there are no rules. The RZA proved that as he will just get on the keyboards and play some crazy melodies and then he will just loop up a classic soul record like it is all his, just showing his versatility.

The Charmels samples set the foundation for the ‘C.R.E.A.M.’ The sample appears at 0:26 mark of the record and throughout.

The Charmels – As Long as I’ve Got You

Uploaded by isitretro

The Charmels created ‘As Long as I’ve Got You’ in 1967. The sample is taken in two parts of the record, 0:00 and 0:17.

3. Ice Cube – It Was a Good Day

Ice Cube – It Was a Good Day

Uploaded by ibiabou89

Ice Cube’s ‘It Was a Good Day’ record is from his The Predator album, which was produced in 1992. DJ Posh produced the record. DJ Posh sampled The Isley Brothers’ “Footsteps in the Dark.’ The Isley Brothers sample sets the foundation of Ice Cube’s record. Ice Cube tells The Huffington Post the concept behind ‘It Was a Good Day’:

You know — it’s a song. It’s a fictional song. It’s basically my interpretation of what a great day would be. Do you know what I’m saying? So, you know, it’s a little of this and a little of that. I don’t think you can pinpoint the day.

The sample appears at the 0:10 mark of the record and throughout.

The Isley Brothers – Footsteps in the Dark

Uploaded by LRyder79

The Isley Brothers created ‘Footsteps in the Dark’ in 1977 for their Go for Your Guns album. The sample is taken from two parts in the record, 0:07 and 0:43.

4. Mobb Deep – Quite Storm

Mobb Deep – Quite Storm

Uploaded by prodigyHNIC2

Mobb Deep’s ‘Quite Storm’ record is from their Murda Muzik album, which was produced in 1999. Havoc from Mobb Deep produced the record, and also is the main producer on the album. Havoc sampled Grandmaster Melle Mel’s ‘White Lines (Don’t Don’t Do It).’ Steve Sola, “Mix King,” was the engineer for Mobb Deep’s Murda Muzik album. Sola tells hiphopdx.com the process of making ‘Quite Storm’ record:

I was the one who put the rain and the thunderstorm at the beginning – how it climbs up, those were my ideas. One of the A&Rs on the track, Jonathan [Lighty], suggested putting Havoc on the hook and make it a little more bouncy as we had always had [Prodigy] on the hook. So Havoc doing what he did killed the hook and it was a combination of everyone as a team and then with the mix making it sound the way it did, every one was more interested.

The sample appears at 0:05 mark of the record and throughout.

Grandmaster Melle Mel – White Lines (Don’t Don’t Do It)

Uploaded by uLise4Life

Grandmaster Melle Mel created White Lines (Don’t Don’t Do It)’ in 1983. The sample is taken at the 0:09 mark of the record.

5. Dr. Dre – Still D.R.E.

Dr. Dre – Still D.R.E.

Published on Oct 27, 2011 by DrDreVEVO

Dr. Dre’s ‘Still D.R.E.’ record is from 2001 album, which was produced in 2000. Dr. Dre and Scott Storch produced the record. Dr. Dre and Storch sampled Grant Green’s ‘Maybe Tomorrow.’ The sample appears at 0:22 and throughout the record. What is interesting about the ‘Still D.R.E.’ record is that Storch was rarely given credit, and was the one who produced the famous piano riff. Another interesting fact about the record was Jay-Z wrote Dr. Dre’s verses for the record.

Grant Green – Maybe Tomorrow

Uploaded by incrediblecHiller

Grant Green created ‘Maybe Tomorrow’ for his Visions album, which was produced in 1971. The sample was taken at the 1:24 mark of the record.

6. Luniz – I Got 5 on It

Luniz – I Got 5 on It

Uploaded by SteinHarte2K9

Luniz’s ‘I Got 5 on It’ record is from their Operation Stackola album, which was produced in 1995. Tonecapone produced this record, and also produced a few other tracks on the album. Tonecapone sampled two records to make ‘I Got 5 on It.’ Tonecapone sampled Kool & the Gang’s ‘Jungle Boogie’ and Club Nouveau’s ‘Why you Treat Me So Bad.’ The Club Nouveau’s sample and the Kool & the Gang’s sample appears at 0:03 mark and throughout the record.

Club Nouveau – Why You Treat Me So Bad

Uploaded by mrfixit8312

Club Nouveau created ‘Why You Treat Me So Bad’ record, which is from her Life, Love, and Pain album. The album was produced in 1986. The sample was taken at the 0:32 mark of the song. This sample set the foundation for the ‘I Got 5 on It’ record.

Kool & the Gang – Jungle Boogie

Uploaded by johnniewalker23

Kool & the Gang created ‘Jungle Boogie’ record, which is from their Wild and Peaceful album. The album was produced in 1973. The sample was taken at the 0:04 mark of the song. This sample provided the drums for the ‘I Got 5 on It’ record.

7. Dr. Dre – Deep Cover

Dr.Dre – Deep Cover

Uploaded by BVMUndergroundHipHop

Dr. Dre’s ‘Deep Cover’ record is from the Deep Cover original sound track, which was produced in 1991. Dr.Dre produced this record for the Deep Cover movie. Dr. Dre sampled two records to make ‘Deep Cover.’ Dr. Dre sampled The Undisputed Truth’s ‘I’m Losing You’ and Sly & the Family Stone’s ‘Sing a Simple Song.’ The ‘I’m Losing You’ sample appears at 0:31 and the ‘Sing the Simple Song’ appear at 0:28 and throughout the record. What is interesting about this the ‘Deep Cover” record is that Big Pun brought the instrumental from Dr. Dre for his ‘Twinz (Deep Cover 98)’ record for his Capital punishment album in 1998. Big Pun didn’t change the instrumental at all, that is why the title has ‘Deep Cover 98’ in it.

The Undisputed Truth- I’m Losing You

Uploaded by FunkySevenHills

The Undisputed Truth created ‘I’m Losing You’ record in 1975, which is from their The Cosmic Truth album. The sample is taken from 0:08 mark of the record.

Sly & the Family Stone – Sing a Simple Song

Uploaded by PerryCoxPF93
Sly & the Family Stone created ‘Sing a Simple Song’ record in 1968, which is from their Stand! album. The sample is taken from 2:12 mark of the record.

Big Pun – Twinz (Deep Cover 98)

Uploaded by BigPunisherVEVO

8. Nas – NY State of Mind

Nas – NY State of Mind

Uploaded by digidrago

Nas ‘NY State of Mind’ record is from his Illmatic album, which was produced in 1994. DJ Premier produced the record. DJ Premier sampled Joe Chambers’s ‘Mind Rain’ for this record. DJ Premier tells Complex.com the process of working with Nas on ‘NY State of Mind’ record:

So I came in here, and flipped the ill, gutter, Joe Chambers sample (‘Mind Rain’). I can tell you because it’s cleared. [Laughs.] Nas watched me build the beat from scratch. And he wrote the verse in the studio. If you listen to ‘N.Y. State of Mind’ you’ll hear him going, ‘I don’t know how to start this shit,’ because he literally just wrote it. Before he started the verse, I was signaling him going, ‘One, two, three,’ and he just goes in like, ‘Rappers I monkey flip’em, in the funky rhythm.” He did that in one take. After he did that first verse, he goes, ‘How was that? Did that sound all right?’ And we were just like, ‘Oh, my God! The streets are going to go crazy when they hear this!

The sample appears at 0:00 and throughout the record.

Joe Chambers – Mind Rain

Uploaded by AMAruofAssassinz

Joe Chambers created the ‘Mind Rain’ record in 1977, which is from his Double Exposure album. The sample is taken from 1:08 mark of the record.

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