CRN 5703, Section 41, Messina, Summer 1 2015

Syllabus

MIS5402 – Managing Technology and Systems

CRN 5703, Section 411

Instructor

Tony Messina (TonyMessina@temple.edu).

Office Hours: by appointment.  Please contact me by email to arrange.

Class Meeting: Monday / Wednesday, 6:00 – 8:30pm, TUCC 606

 

Course Description

Organizations that strategically select, manage, and deploy digital business models prosper in the global economy. Students will use systems and business process thinking to create and analyze strategies for technology-enabled organizational and industry transformation. They will propose innovative solutions for new and existing business initiatives to leverage enterprise, consumer, and social technologies.

 

MBA Program Competency  Course Learning Objective Key Skills Evaluation Method

 

Influential

Communication

 

Business

Reasoning

 

Identify and

Evaluate

Business

Opportunities

Use innovation frameworks to analyze competitive landscape for emerging IT products and services.

 

Apply new digital business models such as cloud computing, web services, crowdsourcing, and two sided platforms to envision new products and services.

 

Analyze disruptive potential of technology and formulate a response from an incumbent firm.

 

Create a business case for the value of an information technology initiative

Articulate the business case

for IT in writing and

presentations

Case

Analysis

 

Participation

 

Reflection

Journal

Implementation

Management

Analyze the transformative impact of technology on standard business practices.

 

Identify the components of enterprise information architecture and its strategic role in the organization.

Demonstrate ability to

identify systems and

processes in an IT

implementation

Learn IT

 

Participation

Cross-Cultural

Effectiveness

Compare IT governance models in both a single-country and

Multi-national context.

Identify key issues in adaptation of governance models to local settings within a multi-national firm. Participation

 

Case

Analysis

Ethical

Management

Explain the role of data, information,

and knowledge in informing an

organization’s strategy

Articulate guidelines for ethical use of corporate data. Participation

Case

Analysis

Reflection

Journal

 

 

 

Grading Criteria

A and A- The assignment consistently exceeds expectations. It demonstrates originality of thought and creativity throughout. Beyond completing all of the required elements, new concepts and ideas are detailed that transcend general discussions along similar topic areas. There are few mechanical, grammatical or organizational issues that detract from the presented ideas.

B-, B, B+ The assignment consistently meets expectations. It contains all the information prescribed for the assignment and demonstrates a command of the subject matter. There is sufficient detail to cover the subject completely but not too much as to be distracting. There may be some procedural issues, such as grammar or organizational challenges, but these do not significantly detract from the intended assignment goals.

C-, C, C+ The assignment fails to consistently meet expectations. That is, the assignment is complete but contains problems that detract from the intended goals. These issues may be relating to content detail, be grammatical, or be a general lack of clarity. Other problems might include not fully following assignment directions.

Below C- The assignment constantly fails to meet expectations. It is incomplete or in some other way consistently fails to demonstrate a firm grasp of the assigned material.

 

Course Grade Components

 

Assignment Weight
Participation and Class Preparation 25%
Learn Information Technology Projects (2) 25%
Case Study Analyses (2)* 25%
Reflection Journal* 25%

* The case study analysis and reflection journal will be prepared in a slide deck format.

 

 

Required Text and Readings

The materials for this course are drawn from multiple sources.

  1. There is no required textbook for this course. You can purchase the required case studies online at https://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cbmp/access/36847544 (note: registration & login required to access and order the course packet).
  2. There are additional assigned readings throughout the course. These are available for free on the web.

Web articles will also be placed on a community site once established use the syllabus until further notice.

 


 

Course Schedule

 

Class Session Major Topics Read in Advance Due by Start of Class
 

May 11

Course Introduction

 

Business Model Analysis

 

Globalization – The World is Flat

 

Syllabus

 

 

Business Model Generation (Ostervalder & Pigneur) p.1-47http://www.businessmodelgeneration.com/book

(for in class discussion)

 

 

 
 

May 13

 

Systems Thinking

 

Crowdsourcing, Online Reviews

Wikipedia: Cybernetics http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cybernetics

Aaronson, D. (1998). Overview of Systems Thinking. http://www.thinking.net/Systems_Thinking/OverviewSTarticle.pdf

 

Case: AirBnB (P)

Weekly Reading Summary Case Mapping (Not Graded)

 

Learn IT #1

 

 

May 18

Disruptive Innovation

Two-Sided Platforms

Wikipedia: Network Effect http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_effect

Christensen, Clayton M.; Overdorf, Michael (March–April 2000), “Meeting the challenge of disruptive change”, Harvard Business

Review (Available through TU Library)

 

Disruptive technology. Wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disruptive_technology

 

Case: Google (P)

 

 

Weekly Reading Summary

 

 

 

Case #1

 

 

May 20

Ethics and Continuity

Management

Missed Alarms and 40 Million Stolen Credit Card Numbers: How Target Blew It   http://www.businessweek.com/printer/articles/188935-missed-alarms-and-40-million-stolen-credit-card-numbers-how-target-blew-it

 

Case: When Hackers Turn to Blackmail (P)

 

Case: CareGroup (P)

Weekly Reading Summary

 

Case Mapping

(Not Graded)

 

 

May 27

Digital Innovation

Activity: Open-Sourcing

In the Next Industrial Revolution, Atoms Are the New Bits

http://www.wired.com/magazine/2010/01/ff_newrevolution/

 

Free! Why $0.00 Is the Future of Business

http://www.wired.com/techbiz/it/magazine/16-03/ff_free?currentPage=all

 

Case: Radiohead (A) (P)

Weekly Reading Summary

 

Case Mapping (Not Graded)

 

Learn IT #2

 

June 1

Knowledge Management and Bus. Intelligence

 

Activity: Business Models and Processes

Wenger: Communities of Practice (all sections)

(See course blog for link) http://community.mis.temple.edu/mis5402s15/files/2015/03/Communities-of-practice.pdf

 

Case: Open Innovation at Siemens  (P)

 

 

 

Weekly Reading Summary

 

 

Case #2

 

June 3

Global Management and

Platform Strategies

Case: Wyeth (P)

 

Case: Volkswagen (P)

Weekly Reading Summary

 

Reflection Journal (Due

within 48 hours of final

class meeting)

 

 

Citation Guidelines

If you use text, figures, and data in reports that was created by others you must identify the source and clearly differentiate your work from the material that you are referencing. Citations are required for all images and figures included in your assignments. If you fail to do so you are plagiarizing. There are many different acceptable formats that you can use to cite the work of others. The format is not as important as the intent. You must clearly show the reader what is your work and what is a reference to someone else’s work.

 

Academic Honesty

 

Source: Temple University Graduate Bulletin. Available online at: http://www.temple.edu/grad/policies/index.htm

 

Academic honesty and integrity constitute the root of the educational process at Temple

University. Intellectual growth relies on the development of independent thought and respect for the thoughts of others. To foster this independence and respect, plagiarism and academic cheating are prohibited.

 

Plagiarism is the unacknowledged use of another individual’s ideas, words, labor, or assistance.

All coursework submitted by a student, including papers, examinations, laboratory reports, and oral presentations, is expected to be the individual effort of the student presenting the work.

When it is not, that assistance must be reported to the instructor. If the work involves the consultation of other resources such as journals, books, or other media, those resources must be cited in the appropriate style. All other borrowed material, such as suggestions for organization, ideas, or actual language, must also be cited. Failure to cite any borrowed material, including information from the internet, constitutes plagiarism. Academic cheating results when the general rules of academic work or the specific rules of individual courses are broken. It includes falsifying data; submitting, without the instructor’s approval, work in one course that was done for another; helping others to plagiarize or cheat from one’s own or another’s work; or undertaking the work of another person.

 

The penalty for academic dishonesty can vary from a reprimand and receiving a failing grade for

a particular assignment, to a failing grade in the course, to suspension or expulsion from the

University. The penalty varies with the nature of the offense. Students who believe that they have been unfairly accused may appeal through their school/college’s academic grievance procedure and, ultimately, to the Graduate Board if academic dismissal has occurred.

 

Academic dishonesty will not be tolerated in this class. In cases of cheating, both parties will be held equally responsible, i.e. both the student who shares the work and the student who copies the work. Penalties for such actions are given at instructor discretion, and can range from a failing grade for the individual assignment, to a failing grade for the entire course.

 

 

 

Participation

This course applies a discussion-based method of instruction which relies heavily on your active participation and preparation both in-class and online. You are expected to read the case studies and readings and come prepared to engage the class in a meaningful conversation.

You are encouraged to use your knowledge and experiences to build, test, and modify your own concepts through dialogues with the instructor and fellow students. Much of your learning will occur as you prepare for and participation in discussions about the course material. The course material has been carefully chosen to bring the real world into class discussion while also illustrating fundamental concepts.

Preparation for Class

Preparation before class – Each week (except the first class meeting) you will submit a brief summary of those readings assigned for that class period (see the course schedule). This includes the cases. Submit a hard copy at the beginning of class and bring a copy for your reference during the discussion.

Your weekly summary should include the following:

  1. One key point you took from each assigned reading, including the cases (even if you submitted a case  anlysis that week): one sentence per reading.
  2. One key point you learned from the readings as a whole: one sentence maximum.
  3. One discussion question that you would ask your fellow classmates: one sentence maximum.

Finally, keep in mind this assignment is graded pass/fail. Only assignments that completely follow the above requirements will receive credit for that week.

Participation During Class

We will typically start each session with “opening” questions about the assigned readings and case study. Students called up to answer should be able to summarize the key issues, opportunities, and challenges in the case study. All students should be prepared to be answer these questions.

If for some reason you feel unprepared to respond to a question, you may say “pass” and I will call on another student. To earn full participation credit, keep the total number of “passes” to a minimum over the course of the semester. Another important aspect of class participation is completion of in-class assignments and contribution to break-out group activities.

Classroom Etiquette

The environment you and your fellow students create in class directly impacts the value that is gained from the course. My over-ridding expectation is:

  • Everyone will be fully engaged and will remain engaged for the entirety of each class meeting.

Here are specific behaviors that will help all of us meet that expectation:

  • Arrive on time and stay until the end of class.
  • Turn off cell phones ringers and alarms while in class.
  • Freely use electronic devices to enhance your education experience by taking notes and researching class topics.
  • Restrict usage not directly related to class to before class, during class breaks, or after class. This includes activities such as checking email, personal Internet browsing and sending instant messages.
  • During class time speak to the entire class (or breakout group) and let each person “take their turn.”

Learn IT!

Information technology is pervasive in our personal and professional lives. The goal of this assignment is to help you expand your areas of knowledge.

  1. Learn IT! #1: An Hour of Code
  2. Learn IT! #2: Lynda.com Software Training

Submit hard copy in class on the due date (see schedule in syllabus).

Case Study Analyses

In addition to preparing to discuss each of the assigned case studies, you will prepare an in‐depth analysis of two case studies during the semester. See the course schedule for due dates.  We will discuss working on cases in groups or individually on week 1.

To complete a case analysis:

  1. Map the business case to the Ostervalder & Pigneur Business Model (reading listed in week 1).
  2. Use the mapping to inform your assessment of either one single question or a set of closely related questions. Make it very clear what questions you are answering. NOTE: You do not need to include the mapping in your final product — you can, but it is not required. You will be assessed on the insights you generate about the case.
  3. Document your analysis as a slide deck (10 slides maximum). The first slide must include your name and the case name.
  1. Submit a hard copy of the assignment by the start of class on the due date. Since we are discussing the material in class, cases must be completed on time in order to receive credit. Late submissions will receive a failing grade.

Because we are discussing the material in class, cases must be completed on time in order to receive credit. Late submissions will receive a failing grade.

Case #1: Google, Inc.

  • The case describes several of Google’s “products” (their search engine, Gmail, Google Earth, etc.). What do they have in common? How would you describe the line of business Google is in?
  • What is Google’s revenue model (how do they make money)? Who are its customers? With this in mind, what is Google’s real product?
  • Based on the material in the case, how would you describe Google’s strategy? Do they have one?
  • The last section of the case is titled “What Should Google Do?” What do you think Google should do (it doesn’t have to be one of the options described in the case)? Make sure you explain why you chose that course of action.
  • How has Google created an organizational structure that encourages and enables innovation? Give specific examples.

Case #2: Open Innovation at Siemens

  • If you were in charge of open innovation at Siemens, what metrics would you use to measure your success? What metrics would you favor if you were a Siemens board member?
  • What do you think Siemens should do next? Are there specific open innovation initiatives that should be changed, dropped, or retained?
  • Using the Siemens case as an example of pros and cons of open innovation, what should a company consider if it is considering doing something similar?

 

 

Learn IT #1

Activity: You too can code

Objective

The objective of this activity is to demystify programming by learn the basics of a popular programming language (JavaScript).

Activity Requirements

  • Go to http://www.codecademy.com/ and create an account (“Sign up”).
  • Go to http://www.codecademy.com/goals/hour-of-code and complete the activity.
  • When you are done, visit your site profile, click on the achievements tab, and make a screen print showing your name and achievement badges.
  • Prepare a 1 page document answering the following questions
  1. Has your view of computer programming changed after completing an hour of code?
  2. Some people say that every student should learn to code. Do you agree or disagree?
  3. What are 3 key things you learned?
  4. Are you likely to use this resource again? Would you recommend it to others? Why or why not?
  • Submit a hard copy of your 1 page summary and a screen print of your achievement badges by the assigned due date.

 

 

Reflection Journal

Prepare a journal documenting the key ideas presented in the class sessions. The reflection journal serves as a “take home” final for this course.

The key factors in the evaluation of your work are:

  • Your interpretation of the main ideas presented and discussed in the course, and
  • The quality of your insights.

Your journal should be constructed individually and focus on the following:

  • What were the major topics discussed in the course?
  • What were the key management issues related to those topics?
  • What insights — personal and professional — did you learn while taking the course?

In summary, the reflection journal is an opportunity for you to demonstrate what you have learned while taking this course.

Requirements

  • Summarize the course in a set of no more than 10 PowerPoint slides. (Submissions with more than 10 slides will earn a failing grade.)
  • Use your slides to communicate the key points in a concise and direct manner. You may use the “Notes” section for your own use; I will only review the slides themselves when grading your journal.
  • On the first slide include your name, the course number and the assignment title in a clearly identifiable manner. It is up to you if you want to put any additional content on the first slide.
  • Other than the requirements stated above, you may organize the material in whatever manner you determine is more effective.
  • Submit your journal via email to me at tony.messina@temple.edu by the due date listed on the course schedule. The file must be either a Microsoft Powerpoint file (.ppt or .pptx) or a PDF file. No other file types will be accepted.
  • Late submissions will not receive assignment credit.

Tips

  • Start immediately: update the journal as part of your preparation for each class meeting; continue to refine the content after each class meeting.
  • Start the file as a PowerPoint file – don’t start in Word and assume you will convert later. That will be a lot of work. PowerPoint constrains the amount of space you have. That is a good thing.
  • Be creative: this is an opportunity to stretch your skills for creating engaging content. There is no one right format or formula for a reflection journal.

 

 

Reading Assignments

Material listed as (P) are part of course packet available through Harvard Publishing.

Week 1 – Read in Advance

Week 2 – Read in Advance

 

  • Case: Google (P)

Week 4 – Read in Advance

Week 5 – Read in Advance

Week 6 – Read in Advance

Week 7 – Read in Advance

  • Case: Wyeth (P)
  • Case: Volkswagen (P)

 

Case Questions

Airbnb (A)

  • Is there anything Airbnb could have done to avoid the “EJ” incident? How about the aftermath?
  • What should Airbnb do the further facilitate trust between renters and hosts?
  • Airbnb and eBay are similar in that both companies run online marketplaces that match buyers with sellers. Should Airbnb adopt the eBay reputation systems? Why or why not?

Google, Inc.

  • The case describes several of Google’s “products” (their search engine, Gmail, Google Earth, etc.). What do they have in common? How would you describe the line of business Google is in?
  • What is Google’s revenue model (how do they make money)? Who are its customers? With this in mind, what is Google’s real product?
  • Based on the material in the case, how would you describe Google’s strategy? Do they have one?
  • The last section of the case is titled “What Should Google Do?” What do you think Google should do (it doesn’t have to be one of the options described in the case)? Make sure you explain why you chose that course of action.
  • How has Google created an organizational structure that encourages and enables innovation? Give specific examples.

When Hackers Turn to Blackmail

  • Describe the security breach experienced by Sunnylake. Why do you think this breach occurred?  Does the reason a network fails change the nature of the response? For example, in what ways is Sunnylake’s response helped or hindered by receiving a ransom notice?
  • What do you think Sunnylake should do now? Would you make the same recommendation to your manager if all of your office was locked out of its computer systems?

CareGroup

  • What was the underlying cause of the collapse of the CareGroup system? What would you have done to avoid this?
  • Does the reason a network fails change the nature of the response? Do you think CareGroup would have reacted differently if they had coincidently received a threatening message?

Radiohead (A)

  • How did Radiohead sell their album “In Rainbows”? Was it successful? What problems could this create for other artists?
  • In what was is digital content disruptive to the music industry?
  • Are recording companies becoming obsolete?

Open Innovation at Siemens

  • If you were in charge of open innovation at Siemens, what metrics would you use to measure your success? Would metrics would you favor if you were a Siemens board member.
  • What do you think Siemens should do next? Are there specific open innovation initiatives that should be changed, dropped, or retained?
  • Using the Siemens case as an example of pros and cons of open innovation, what should a company consider if it is considering doing something similar?

Wyeth

  • What was the role of IT in the globalization of Wyeth?
  • Two major components of Wyeth’s global IT strategy were its ERP system and its “Global Data Warehouse.” In what ways do you think that the global nature of these initiatives influenced their design, development, and implementation?
  • Would you say that IT-enabled globalization is simply another version of the centralization/decentralization decision that any company makes when it has multiple divisions, or is it fundamentally different? Explain.

Volkswagen

  • What is your assessment of the new process for managing priorities at Volkswagen of America? Is it better or worse than the old process? Are the criticisms justified?
  • How should Matulovic respond to his fellow executives who are calling to ask him for special treatment outside the new priority management system? Does Volkswagen need a new selection system?
  • How is it possible that under this new system a “critical” project (global supply chain system) was unfunded? What should be done about that?

 

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