Section 005, Instructor: Shana Pote

Weekly Question #5: Complete by Oct. 12, 2017

Leave your response as a comment on this post by the beginning of class on October 12, 2017. Remember, it only needs to be three or four sentences. For these weekly questions, I’m mainly interested in your opinions, not so much particular “facts” from the class!

Here is the question:

Just like you did about a month ago, find another online article dated within last two weeks from a credible source that has something to do with data and is interesting and relevant to you. Copy and paste the URL directly into your response followed by a few sentences that explain what is interesting about it.

19 Responses to Weekly Question #5: Complete by Oct. 12, 2017

  • URL: https://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2017/10/02/business/02reuters-usa-stocks.html

    The article I read discussed the analysis of the Wall Street Stock Market by utilizing data to compare the prices of stocks and bonds. The data compared the prices of current stocks and bonds to their past prices and determined that prices in the current quarter are higher than they were in the past, which means that there has been improvement in the economy. The article discussed the Dow Jones Industrial Average, S & P Index, the NASDAQ, and the NYSE and compared the respective prices of the stocks within each index to each other.

  • https://techcrunch.com/2017/10/06/sourcegraph-raises-20m-bring-more-live-collaboration-to-programming/
    I found the above article pretty interesting. It is about a new development platform for programmers. It’s a way to collaborate and see what other people are working on in a way to level out the playing field for those in coding who don’t work for the major tech companies. The whole goal is to accelerate the speed of innovation and increase efficiency. This is interesting to me because I am in a application development class and this ties into that, as well as the typical idea of a programmer is someone working individually and this would be a way to collaborate on edits to code.

  • https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/09/fargo-to-four-weddings-readers-25-best-films-of-the-90s
    I thought this article was really interesting. It talks about the best films of the 90’s based on people’s opinions between the ages of 30-50, because at that time they would’ve been between 10-30 years old when the movies first came out. The movies go in order of release date, which is well organized. The whole goal of this article is to give reader’s the data of these movies based on people’s opinions, release date, a photo from the film, and a description of the film. I find this interesting because I am an avid movie watcher, and have seen about half of the films talked about in this article.

  • http://www.adweek.com/agencies/publicis-creates-a-new-data-division-called-spine-and-shifts-digitaslbi-to-its-media-hub/
    I found this article about how Publicis Groupe, one of the largest conglomerates of ad agencies, has recently developed a data-collecting system called Publicis Spine. I found it interesting because while advertising using a lot of data to do marketing research, there hasn’t been such a centralized way to access data for a brand. The article mentions how brands are experiences today, and it’s important to provide consumers with an excellent experience. A way to quickly access and analyze data about consumers will allow companies to do that. This is an example of the industry making data applicable to their clients.

  • http://www.dataversity.net/fundamentals-predictive-analytics/
    I think this article is interesting because it discusses the basis of predictive analysis. I think this is very useful technology because it can be used to detect fraud. This would be useful for banks and credit unions to help stop identity theft, which would also be beneficial to people like myself. Since I have a debit card, this type of technology would be great for me incase I lose my card or something. I think it’s interesting how data can be analyzed and used to make educated predictions, however I wonder how accurate this information is.

  • https://www.cbssports.com/fantasy/football/news/week-6-fantasy-football-rankings-injuries-dominate-the-headlines-ty-montgomery-marcus-mariota-tom-brady-improve/
    Fantasy football is a very important part of my Sunday. I rely heavily on data analytics to decide who I will start or bench week in and week out. For example, companies like CBS and ESPN compile data from all facets of football to give the projected amount of points for each player. They take into account things like passer rating, defensive stops, number of field goals made, etc. I think fantasy sports are some of the best applications of data in the modern world because so many people now rely on it so they can now be part of the game also.

  • http://news.mit.edu/2017/first-open-access-data-large-collider-subatomic-particle-patterns-0929
    Data collected from the Compact Muon Solenoid experiement (a main detector in the Large Hadron Collider) was released to the public through the CERN Open Data Portal. In the field of particle physics, open data has not been widely used for fear of amateurs looking at the data and drawing the wrong conclusions from it. After releasing the data though, Jesse Thaler an associate professor of physics at MIT, was able to use the data to, for the first time, reveal a universal feature within jets of subatomic particles, which are produced when high-energy protons collide. “This feature can be used to predict the energy imparted to each particle as it cleaves from a mother quark or gluon.”

  • https://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21729464-drone-insurance-showing-way-huge-volumes-data-make-real-time-insurance

    I found this article from the Economist titled “Huge volumes of data make real-time insurance a possibility”. The article talks about how drone insurance startups are showing the way for the on-demand insurance. With the increase of drones use, insurance startups such as Flock and Verifly rely on their apps to gather a wide range data to offer a quote to the pilots as well as how they can reduce risks. The data range includes weather forecast, nearby aircrafts, local topography, and other factors. Also, car insurance startups such as Root uses their apps to offer insurance based on minute to minute behavior of drivers. According to the article, this type of insurance is expected to increase with the increase of autonomous activities.

  • https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2017/10/11/politicians-take-a-negative-view-on-trade-deals-even-the-ones-they-voted-for/?utm_term=.867d92dca0c8

    I found this article, (written by a Temple Political Science Professor), to be of interest. According to the data compiled by the Wisconsin Advertising Project, presidential/mid-term campaign advertisements (2002-2008) were overwhelmingly negative on trade issues, despite the fact that most congressman who ran negative ads voted for pro-trade agreements. The discrepancy between public perceptions of free-trade and the actions of politicians suggests that the political cost of running pro-trade advertisements are too high, even though research demonstrates that public opinion would be influenced positively. The research challenges existing voter-driven models of trade policy, and calls into question the salience of trade policy.

  • https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/sep/26/national-park-plastics-bottled-water-ban
    This article discusses the ban on plastic water bottles in national parks and the negative effects of the reversal of this ban. I found this article interesting because it mentioned that this ban saves 2 million plastic bottles from being discarded in these parks, which equates to 111,743 pounds of plastic. This amount of plastic is the equivalent of 326 barrels of oil worth of emissions. This lifting of this ban will have serious negative impacts.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/the-grandfather-of-alt-science/

    As someone who was once a science major, seeing someone conduct research of this magnitude with funding like this with no government oversight is beyond rare. Arthur B. Robinson is conducting urinalysis on 50,000 separate samples that will potentially allow them to detect patterns in the samples. They may be able to detect signs of things like early stage breast cancer or an impending heart attack across these samples. This is beyond useful and it’s made more impactful because it’s simply a man and his children doing it, backed by donors who share his wary stance on government oversight.

  • https://www.cnbc.com/2017/10/12/equifax-says-it-might-have-been-breached-again.html
    A article titled “Hacked again? Equifax shares drop after possible new cybereach” from CNBC talks about that Equifax might have been hacked again. The company said the security team are looking for another possible hack after the one the disclosed a month ago that exposed 145.5 million people’s information. Because of this possible hack, Equifax stock shares dropped as much as 3.5 percent. If Equifax can’t find a way to fix this problem, they will starting losing money from their investors. Also there will be more personal information getting exposed by the hackers.

  • https://www.economist.com/news/business/21729781-high-growth-kind-has-rebounded-sharply-lows-after-great-recession-american

    The article talks about entrepreneurial activities in United States. Data shows that in 2015 the number of new firms created in America was nearly a fifth lower than the annual average between 1998 and 2008, and just half of companies founded in 2015 will survive to 2020. However, a recent report suggests that these numbers may be masking more encouraging deeper trends. The 30,000 young and ambitious American firms have a disproportionate positive impact on employment and economic growth. Despite the overall decline in business formation, their high-growth-entrepreneurship index has now rebounded to match its pre-recession value. Furthermore, entrepreneurship is starting to spread beyond the main startup hubs. Although California, New York and Massachusetts account for 3/4 of venture capital investment, the best performer in Kauffman’s index among the country’s 50 biggest metropolitan areas was Provo, Utah, a city of 600,000 people south of Salt Lake City.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/is-your-dd-character-rare/
    I found this interesting article. It is about the game Dungeon&Dragon. From this data we can see that most of people are tend to create the character related to themselves or at least from an existed prototype. For example, the most used type of character is Human Fighter, which is the most common character. Other common instances like “Dwarf Fighters” “Elf Wizard” or “Elf Druid”, these types of character appears in many movies and games. I think this data is deeply related to psychology stuffs. Maybe game and movie companies could use these data to create more attracting works to make more profit. Altogether, most of people are still create and imagine things based on existences and stereotypes.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/kelvin-benjamin-is-the-nfls-clutchest-receiver/

    This acritical peeked my interest because Calvin Benjamin a big receiver 6’5 250 and he is still one of clutch wide receivers in the NFL even though he Is not the most athletic looking in his pre-game warmups. based on the number shown in the graphs in the article his numbers actually improve over the course of the game. Basically he get stronger as the game get longer, and that’s hard for someone of his size to do so its going against the norm. and that would make him interesting to watch in the future games for me.

  • https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/oct/06/bookmaker-launch-mobile-app-betting-live-horse-races
    This article talks about how betters will now be able to place bets on their mobile devices. But this isn’t new, the new part is that gamblers can place bets in the middle of races. Also the betters will have access to big data that tell sectional times, ground covered by the horses, and many more pieces of data. This will not only help the betters, but it will also be telling statistics to the riders and the horses themselves. This data will be tracked by GPS technology, and is accurate to .1 seconds and .1 meters.

  • https://9to5mac.com/2017/07/19/google-feed-ios-app/
    I actually found this article a little frightening and intriguing at the same time. It’s a cool feature that google has added so you can now see more of what you’re interested in. The downfall of this feature is it creates a more restrictive filter bubble because you’re restricting what you see intentionally without knowing you’re missing out on other things. Giving the option to see what you have an interest in makes it so you begin to see less controversial things and you have one-sided opinions now more frequently.

  • https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/mass-shootings-are-a-bad-way-to-understand-gun-violence/

    This article was interesting because of the perspective it took on mass shooting incidents in America versus in other countries. The article said that “Between 1966 and 2012, there were 90 such incidents in the U.S. The next four countries with the most mass shootings had 54 combined.” It was also interesting because the article talks about the reactions to these mass shootings. Other countries do not react the same way that America does to gun related incidents. In the USA, gun ownership is protected by the Second Amendment, whereas, it is not in other countries, which is why there is so many more incidents here.

  • http://www.youredm.com/2017/12/13/mixcloud-shares-2017-year-end-listening-data-statistics/
    This article is a breakdown of the listening trends on the music streaming platform Mix Cloud. The visualtions show the trends around America and The world. The first visualaztion shows what genre is listened to most state by state. The Second Visualazation shows each countrys most searched hastag for the respective genre. It is interesting because you can easily see what music is popular where.

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Office Hours

Shana Pote
shana.pote@temple.edu

Alter Hall 232
Class time: 5:30-8pm, Thursdays
Office hours: Thursdays, 1 hour before class, or by appointment.