Information Systems Integration – Tony Messina

Wearable Tech in The Workplace: Privacy Issue?

Reports have surfaced that Amazon has filed patents for electronic tracking wristbands that would be worn by its warehouse employees. Although the descriptions for the patents explain that the sole purpose of the wristbands would be to collect data about inventory, the wearable technology would most likely gather tons of data on the employees as well. Essentially, the wristbands would track the products handled by the employees and vibrate to guide the employees’ movements to increase efficiency.

Amazon’s warehouse workers have already been complaining of poor working conditions, and this has the potential to be viewed as an invasion of privacy if implemented. Amazon believes that the technology could greatly improve the productivity of its workers while giving them less time using scanners or computers. However, others think it would be an unethical method and could strain relationships with employees even further.

What do you think? Does company-issued wearable tech belong in the workplace? Is it ethical and productive? Or will it only hurt Amazon’s relationship with its workers?

Source: http://money.cnn.com/2018/02/02/technology/amazon-employee-tracker/index.html

3 Responses to Wearable Tech in The Workplace: Privacy Issue?

  • While an employee is at work, they are on the employer’s dime, and should assume that they are subject to scrutiny. However, the employer must question if the lost worker morale makes up for the improvement in raw productivity. Low morale may translate to increased turnover. If productivity is measured in units processed per dollar, than turnover must be considered.

    Ethically, the employer can track anything their employee consents to. Whether it is ultimately profitable or not can only be concluded through a series of experiments.

  • While an employee is at work, they are on the employer’s dime, and should assume that they are subject to scrutiny. However, the employer must question if the lost worker morale makes up for the improvement in raw productivity. Low morale may translate to increased turnover. If productivity is measured in units processed per dollar, than turnover must be considered.

    Ethically, the employer can track anything their employee consents to. Whether it is ultimately profitable or not can only be concluded through a series of experiments.

  • There can be many benefits to having wearable technology for the employer because they can track employees. However, employees could use it to answer messages quicker and be in touch with the organization all the time, since it is convenient. I feel that there can be many problems having employees wear wearable technology because it does bring up privacy issues. It is more beneficial for the employer than employee, if Amazon has more of an incentive for employees than it could work.

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