Section 004, Instructor: Larry Dignan

Weekly Question #10: Complete by April 23

Leave your response as a comment on this post by the beginning of class on April 23, 2018. Remember, it only needs to be three or four sentences. For these weekly questions, I’m mainly interested in your opinions, not so much particular “facts” from the class!

Here is the question:

Think about a data-driven service that you use regularly (i.e., Blackboard, Amazon.com, Facebook). Imagine you want to store the data for that service in a spreadsheet – what would each row in the spreadsheet represent? What would some of the data columns be?

(For example, Yelp.com stores restaurant reviews. A row would be an individual review, and some columns would be the name of the restaurant, the type of food they serve, the address, the star rating, and the name of the reviewer.)

28 Responses to Weekly Question #10: Complete by April 23

  • For a data-driven service like Amazon.com, data storage would be very complex. If you were to put it in an excel sheet, each row could represent a transaction on their site. Columns would include the product, product description, seller, buyer, price, shipping information, and time of transaction.

  • A data-driven service I use daily would be Instagram. Some of the columns would be name, data, picture type, amount of likes, Amount of followers, Amount of posts, comments, location, tagged people, ect.

  • A data driven service like blackboard. A row would be the course name. some of the columns would be assignments, grades, readings, class activities.

  • The course evaluation for each classes can be a data-driven service. The columns should include course name, the professor, ratings, and students review. The row should include answers for each columns.

  • Amazon

    So many ways you could go with this. Here’s what I think I would do.

    Columns:
    Other products viewed (would need a notation system)
    Avg. order price
    Order frequency
    Personal info (address, age this would take up a few columns)
    Activity metrics – time on site, pages visited

    Rows: User ID

  • A data driven service like amazon would be organized in an excel spread sheet. Columns would include things such as viewed products, and their prices. And the Rows would include entities like people’s names.

  • a data-driven service like canvas would be organized in an excel spreadsheet. Columns would be the course you have taken and the rows would be the grade you received in that class, your professor evaluation, and the credits earned.

  • For a data-driven service like Amazon, a row would be a look through of an item.
    Columns would be:

    Product’s name
    Manufacturer
    Was it was ordered
    Username of the person looking
    Price

  • A data-driven service that I use is LinkedIn. In their data columns you could find:

    People who have viewed your profile
    Connections
    Searches appeared in this week
    Jobs Applied To
    Saved Jobs
    Career Interests

  • A data-driven service I use daily is Instagram. Their data columns would be: followers, following, people who you follow that don’t follow back, people that follow you that you don’t follow back, followers’ engagement rate, most liked posts by month/day of the week/time of the day, most popular posts by type of content – photo or video, most commented posts by type of content.

  • If you would take Facebook information and put it in an excel spreadsheet it would look like this.
    columns would include relationships, like father, mother, brother, sister. the Rows would have the name of that person. you could also set individual profiles in the columns then the rows could be previously liked posts.

  • A data driven service that I use is Canvas. Canvas is a school tool similar to Blackboard, and the data rows would be grades, assignments, tests, quizzes, professor, course name, student ID, and activities.

  • I found a pretty humorous post on social media about Instagram likes & pictures and it sparks an idea for this post (though the direction I take it is probably not how others would do it). The columns could be a numerical representation of your picture (i.e. your first picture would be the first column and so on). The rows would be every single one of your followers. Within each box could be a yes/no, or a 1/0, which would represent who has liked your pictures, allowing the user to keep track. If the user was unhappy, they could badger their friends to like their pictures.

  • I found a pretty humorous post on social media about Instagram likes & pictures and it sparks an idea for this post (though the direction I take it is probably not how others would do it). The columns could be a numerical representation of your picture (i.e. your first picture would be the first column and so on). The rows would be every single one of your followers. Within each box could be a yes/no, or a 1/0, which would represent who has liked your pictures, allowing the user to keep track. If the user was unhappy, they could badger their friends to like their pictures.

  • A data-driven service that I use regularly is Spotify. If I wanted to store this data in a spreadsheet, an example of a row would be the name of the artist and the columns would include albums, singles, features, popular hits, and related artists.

  • A data-driven service that I use regularly is Instagram. If I was to store this data, a row would be the user. The columns would be followers, following, likes, and pictures.

  • Amazon is a data driven source used by most people. If I were to put the data in a spreadsheet, some of the columns of data ratings would include product name, average rating, price, manufacturer and category. I would also include location, shipping, handling, date, and time on the spreadsheet.

  • One data-driven service that I use is Canvas. If I was to store data in a spreadsheet I would have rows of Courses names, and I would have columns of credits for each course, which semester it can be taken, tests for each course, hw’s, projects and the professor available.

  • A data-driven service that I use regularly is Canvas. Canvas is not as complex as an amazon or other network related to it. It is made up of a student’s classes he or she is enrolled in for the semester. With that being said, columns would include: Courses, account, dashboard, calendar, inbox, and help. Rows would include each individual class, individual grading, messages (if any), agenda (on the calendar), and settings.

  • A data- driven service I frequently use is Canvas. Canvas is not nearly as complex as a site like Amazon. With this being said, it is centered around the student and the classes they are enrolled in for the current semester. Columns would include: account, dashboard, courses, calendar, inbox and help. Within these, you will find courses enrolled in, grades, agenda (what is due when for each course), support, messages( if any), etc.

  • For an online academic dashboard like Blackboard or Canvas, the columns I would find more helpful would be: Class Name, Professor, Professor Email, Midterm Grade, Overall Grade, and assignment Due dates. I think these would be more helpful because it is time-consuming for students to go into the syllabus of every individual class to find specific information. The rows would be the individual classes a student is taking in that semester.

  • Amongst a world of a large amount of different data-driven services, I often use SoundCloud. SoundCloud very basic to navigate and also has decent visual layouts. I personally use this music sharing website to release some beats that I may drop as sneak peaks. Some data columns I’d format into the data would be Followers, Following, Tracks, Likes, Trending, and even comments. These would all be placed into data columns that would represent SoundCloud data to a very certain extent.

  • A data-driven service I use daily is Canvas. Canvas stores all my work information from my classes and all grades, files, and spreadsheets from professors. If my data from Canvas was put into a spreadsheet, I would break into rows my overall class grades, test grades, assignment grades, etc., and also personal information, such as professors’ and classmates’ e-mails and other contact information. This spreadsheet, however, would function mainly as organizational platform, rather than serving any real analytical purpose.

  • I’ve been looking for a new apartment in Philadelphia and I’ve been using Trulia.com. To store the data on Trulia in a database, I would designate each row to be an individual listing with the address. Columns could be the location (neighborhood in Philadelphia), price, number of bedrooms, number of bathrooms, washer/dryer (yes or no), central A/C (yes or no), dishwasher (yes or no), utilities included (yes or no), crime rating, walkability rating, and Trulia has a feature called “Near SEPTA” so I would also make that a “yes or no” column.

  • A data driven service that I use regularly is my Starbucks app. With the app and my account I can mobile order, pay in store, get refills, free rewards and frequently custom tailored offers that are designed to entice me to come in more frequently or try a new product that I might enjoy.
    I would have the method of payment, store location, time of day, type of beverage, and type of food on a spreadsheet. With the accumulation of this data it would be easy to design offers for specific customer profiles and theoretically increase their purchases. Every row in the excel sheet would represent a purchase.

  • For Spotify, some columns could be:
    Song name
    Artist
    Album
    Genre
    Number of plays
    Number of likes

  • For a service like Spotify, we could create a catalog of songs. Each individual song would represent a row, and different properties of the song can be represented by different columns. Some of these columns would be the artist, album, record label, number of streams, release date, playlists the song is featured on.

  • I use Soundcloud everyday. This data driven source could categorize audio files in many different ways. Some examples include when the song was posted, the artist, song length, genre, album, song name, playlist, artist, account that posted it, and whether the content was free to download or not.

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Office Hours
Larry Dignan lawrence.dignan@temple.edu Alter Hall 232 267.614.6467 Class time: 5:30-8pm, Mondays Office hours: Monday hour before class, half hour after class or by appointment.