David Eves

  • This past weekend one of those supposedly “friendly” hacker groups took down YouTube, citing “exploiting security issues for customer benefit” as its objective. OurMine, known for its antics in the past includi […]

  • The hacker group known as The Shadow Brokers just dumped a bevy of new hacking tools and programs that they were able to steal from the NSA onto the internet this past weekend. The tools / programs are targeted at […]

  • I know we are supposed to post articles, but I came across this link while searching for one and it turned out to be a video – and I think it’s worth sharing (I found an article about it as well). This past Fri […]

  • Said: great article, and you couldn’t be more right in your assessment. We can’t just look at this in terms of dollars and cents to be made off stolen data, but rather terrorist / ransom attacks that could cripple a cities infrastructure. I liked the comment about “slapping on a layer of security at a later stage…” because that is what many citi…[Read more]

  • This article interviews three execs from three different companies, and explains what they are most concerned with in terms of cyber security. Each of the interviewees had a different “biggest concern,” but all […]

  • James: thanks for posting this, as I mentioned in a prior post, I was a little concerned when Facebook started posting ads for the exact items I was recently searching for, and I just imagined it was all based on cookies. This was a good “intro to pixels” article. If I am reading this right, it would be safe to say that a conversion pixel tra…[Read more]

  • Focusing on the ever-changing technological landscape, this article talks about how the concept of perimeter defenses is almost irrelevant. As the IoT grows, and the demand for innovation via newer technologies […]

  • This article had a different perspective on cyber security, relating vendor-issued security solutions to the physical locks of homes in new neighborhood. Essentially, the author explains that many companies use […]

  • Blake: interesting read, and I don’t know which is more concerning – the fact that we now have to worry about this issue, or the fact that people are able to rig these ATMs without anyone noticing. I imagine that the ATM cameras aren’t monitored 24/7, but between those cameras and the general public, wouldn’t someone notice the install…[Read more]

  • Magaly: I think you are right, and it may only get worse from here on out. The one thing I was curious about, though, is how does this affect companies that allow employees to “connect” from home? I say connect, because “work” from home usually requires a VPN, but connecting (whether via email, or messenger or applications) would all now be subj…[Read more]

  • Darin: Exactly! Those people that that preach cyber security and its dangers (which are very real) are the same ones selling solutions for it. So when you see extremely publicized breaches like this, it’s hard to have that mega-effect trickle down to average consumer. It only puts big businesses in a panic, and results in those companies buying m…[Read more]

  • Thought this was a pretty good article on the culture of cyber security in America. I know we have talked about this before, but this particular piece took a much more detailed look. One point that stuck out to me […]

    • I had a brief stint in political communications, so whenever cyber merges with politics, it’s something I enjoy looking into. I think a big missed opportunity is the ability to use our wealth of technical resources in the private sector to strengthen our government cyber opportunities. I think a driving force behind this is the public mistrust of government. Not only do businesses not trust the government, but people don’t trust the government and might not want to be a customer of a company integrating themselves with government operations.

      The other challenge I see is our hyper-partisan climate we have currently. It’s hard for us to have serious solutions around cyber with the way things are right now.

      I think the DNC hacks were a perfect example. While that was politicized to the max, we lost a real opportunity to communicate that this wasn’t anything of major sophistication and it came down to a human error. Instead we talked about everything but the root causes.

    • Darin: Exactly! Those people that that preach cyber security and its dangers (which are very real) are the same ones selling solutions for it. So when you see extremely publicized breaches like this, it’s hard to have that mega-effect trickle down to average consumer. It only puts big businesses in a panic, and results in those companies buying more cyber security solutions. The root cause, which everyone ignores, is at the user / human level, and – since a way to make big money off of those people hasn’t been figured out yet – the root cause will continue to be ignored. It’s so much more profitable to sell Watson’s service to fortune 500 companies, than it is to educate the average user . . . however, that is just my opinion.

  • David Eves posted a new activity comment 3 weeks, 3 days ago

    Mengting: I can remember reading about the airline hack; if my memory is correct, they got in through one of the media connections, and it just so happened that all the plane’s applications / systems were on the same server.

    In terms of the numbers, the thought of 50 billion devices connected to the internet (and, assuming they are just as s…[Read more]

  • I am sure this will be the first of many controversial policies passed / revoked, but I wanted to share the article because the info being shared is big data 101. Basically, internet customers will now have their […]

    • David,

      I’m not honestly not suprised whatsoever. I just wanted to include that the actions that were protected under the Obama Admin were to prevent companies from:
      – selling your data to marketers
      – highjacking searches
      – snooping thought internet traffic to insert ads
      – pre-installing software on your phone and recording your activity
      – injecting undetectable, undeletable tracking cookies in all of your unsecured web traffic

      Regardless of which side of the party someone falls on, the internet has been turned over to ISPs; thus, stripping away the few rules that protected our privacy. Subsequently, this repeal also means that ISPs are not required to alert you of potential data breaches and take reasonable measures to protect our user data.

      Great, post and sadly, I do not think this will be the only bill passed hindering our data.

    • Magaly: I think you are right, and it may only get worse from here on out. The one thing I was curious about, though, is how does this affect companies that allow employees to “connect” from home? I say connect, because “work” from home usually requires a VPN, but connecting (whether via email, or messenger or applications) would all now be subject to the data that is gathered / turned over to the highest bidder by your ISP. I could be wrong (and I hope I am misinterpreting this), but if I am not, I am curious to see how this effects business.

    • I am pretty disturbed by this. I don’t even like that the ISP stores our history, and now they can sell it without our permission. VPN’s aren’t a bad idea, but what will happen when the VPN decides to sell your data? They also won’t protect you from tracking by google or facebook.

  • David Eves posted a new activity comment 3 weeks, 3 days ago

    Darin: really good article, and – although it was surprising – it really shouldn’t come as a shock when you consider what “benefits” are associated with this information. I think it gets overlooked because of the decentralized and indirect impact, i.e. discounts on goods, free access to paid / licensed programs, etc. There really isn’t a true doll…[Read more]

  • Magaly: thanks for the heads-up. As a chrome user, I have yet to see this, but I did find it interesting that the chrome browser doesn’t flag it as malware – I wonder why that it is? I was a little confused by that end of that author’s sentence though: “the browser does block it because the file is not downloaded too often, which is a standar…[Read more]

  • This article was a Q&A with a health data security expert named Mac McMillan – the CEO and co-founder of CyngergisTek Inc. – and it addressed some interesting topics in terms of the future of cybersecurity. One […]

    • Hey David, I actually read that article and really liked the concept of behavioral technologies. Like, old systems don’t discover identity theft by authorized users. People dont usually think about these things but they can make a difference, especially in the cyber world. Behavioral technologies are based on behavior analysis, which is pretty much all about understanding common user behaviors. As I mentioned in one of my previous post, humans are creature of habits so managers must use deeper analytics to monitor them. Having a baseline understanding of typical user behavior is essential because of possible malicious insiders and even compromised credentials of legitimate users are significant threats.

  • I found this article and thought it was an interesting take on how advanced cyber security threats can only be defended against if man and AI work together (not one or the other). The article explains that the […]

    • Great post David. It really make sense because when you think about it algorithms can make systems smarter, but without adding a little common sense into the equation they can still produce some pretty bizarre results. That’s why human intelligence is also necessary. Combining human analysis and machine data mining will allow to obtain credible data relations.

  • This article projects that – as technology grows within the household (smart TVs, smart phones, watches, appliances, etc.) – the targets for ransomware attacks will be move from big business to John Q. Consumer. […]

    • As we (society) continue to grow in our dependence on technology and connectivity, end users must evolve in our ability to safeguard ourselves from cyber criminal attacks. I am not sure the common users are educating themselves to the vulnerabilities that exist. It seems creating personal resiliency and backup plans would lessen the impact of ransomware attacks. Although I consider myself to be a moderately educated on the perils of cyber attacks, however I cannot claim that I feel safe from possible attacks. Maybe I am ‘old school’ but I still like to maintain my own backups in addition to my automated cloud backups.

      Very good article. Unfortunately, I suspect as stated in the article, the common user will experience more and more grief from breaches on their personal data.

  • I thought the tone of this article was interesting, as it seems that companies are turning to AIs in terms of cyber security. Amazon is now using a recently acquired AI platform to assist in its cyber security […]

  • Load More
Skip to toolbar