Top 15th for the fifth year in a row!

US News Top 15 2017For the fifth year in a row, the Fox School’s Department of Management Information Systems (MIS) Bachelor of Business Administration major in Management Information Systems (BBA MIS) made the US News and World Report Undergraduate Business Specialties national ranking. In the 2017 ranking, which is based on data from 2016, Temple MIS was ranked 14th in the United States. Also for the fifth year in a row, the BBA MIS is the only ranked MIS program among public university’s in the region. 

The top 15 undergraduate ranking follows the top 15 ranking of the Fox MIS graduate programs by US News and World Report for 2017 including the MS in Information Technology Auditing and Cyber-Security (ITACS), and MS Digital Innovation in Marketing. The program rankings follow the No. 1 in the world research ranking of MIS faculty in 2016.

The Fox BBA in MIS is a STEM major that produces digital business innovators and has achieved 100% placement for the last five years. Students in the program learn and continuously develop their professional skills on a proprietary platform.

Fox MIS continues No. 1 in the world ranking for research productivity

FOX MIS Research No. 1 2016The research output of the Temple University Fox School Management Information Systems (MIS) Department continued to be ranked No. 1 in the world in the 2015 update of the rankings based on Association for Information Systems’ (AIS) List of High-quality Journals, specifically Management Information Systems Quarterly (MISQ) and Information Systems Research (ISR) for the 2013-2015 period. See http:/www.myvisionresearch.com/rankings, My Vision Research. The 2015 update was released in late spring 2016.

Temple MIS tied for the number 1 spot with City University of Hong Kong and The University of Texas at Dallas. The analysis focused on Management Information Systems Quarterly (MISQ) and Information Systems Research (ISR), which are the acknowledged top two ‘A’ journals in the field.

Fox MIS also achieved the number 1 rank in 2014, 2013, 2012, and 2010 (third in 2011).

MIS graduate programs move into US News & World Report’s top 15

US News and World Report

The Fox graduate programs in Management Information Systems including the Master of Science in Information Technology Audit and Cyber-Security (ITACS), new online Master of Science Digital Innovation in Marketing (MS DIM), and Information Technology Management concentration (ITM) of the Fox MBA were ranked top 15 in the nation by the U.S. News and World Report rankings of top information systems programs for 2017.

In the 2017 ranking which is based on data collected in 2016, the above programs were ranked 14th in the nation (tied with University of Michigan). Fox MIS moved up 2 slots from the previous rank of 16th in the nation.

The overall 14th in the nation ranking translates into 9th nationally among public universities and 1st regionally among public universities.

“ITACS is quickly becoming a national leader in producing business savvy IT audit and cyber-security professionals; the demand for these individuals is intense in today’s digital centric economy in which internal and external threats continue to multiply,” said Munir Mandviwalla, Chair of the Fox School’s Management Information Systems department.

“The success of the new online Digital Innovation in Marketing is particularly gratifying as it is the first 100% online program that integrates high engagement, networking, and professional development into a streamlined 16 month degree,” said Mandviwalla.

Temple AIS receives 2014-2015 Distinguished Student Chapter award

Philadelphia, PA October 25, 2015 – The Association for Information Systems (AIS) is pleased to recognize Temple University’s student chapter with the Distinguished Chapter Award, one of the association’s annual awards honoring the accomplishments of the best AIS student chapters worldwide. The awards are presented during a ceremony at the International Conference of Information Systems (ICIS), in Ft. Worth, Texas, on Dec. 14, 2015.

The Distinguished Chapter Award recognizes chapters that have excelled in most of the areas of emphasis: professional development, membership, careers in IS, community service, fundraising, and communications.

“AIS takes immense pride in recognizing the distinguished scholars who make up our community, and ultimately, contribute to the success of the field,” said AIS Vice President of Student Chapters James Parrish. “As such, I wanted to take this opportunity to congratulate Temple University’s student chapter as well as the student leaders involved.”

AIS Student Chapters began in 2008 with a two-fold mission to support information systems students in attaining their career goals and help universities provide greater visibility to grow the major on campus.  The annual awards recognize the ‘best of the best’ from the nearly 70 chapters worldwide.

Learn more about Temple AIS at http://templeais.org/

Association for Information Systems

The Association for Information Systems, founded in 1994, is a professional organization with the purpose to serve as the premier global organization for academics, students and professionals specializing in Information Systems. For more information about AIS or to become a member, please visit www.aisnet.org.

Top 15th for the fourth year in a row!

USNewsBBAinMISTop15_2015For the fourth year in a row, the Fox School’s Department of Management Information Systems (MIS) Bachelor of Business Administration major in Management Information Systems (BBA MIS) made the US News and World Report Undergraduate Business Specialties national ranking (note: link requires login). In the 2016 ranking, which is based on data from 2015, FOX MIS was ranked 14th in the United States.

The top 15 undergraduate ranking follows the top 20 ranking of the Fox MIS graduate programs by US News and World Report for 2016. The Fox graduate programs in MIS include the MBA in Information Technology Management (ITM), MS in Information Technology Auditing and Cyber-Security (ITACS), and MS Digital Innovation in Marketing. The program rankings follow the No. 1 in the world research ranking of MIS faculty in 2015.

The FOX BBA in MIS is one of the most innovative undergraduate MIS programs in the nation focusing on producing digital business innovators. Students in the program learn and continuously develop their professional skills on a proprietary learning platform.

Temple’s AIS Student Chapter wins 1st again – for 4th consecutive year!

AIS 2015 ConferenceTemple’s AIS Student Chapter won big again at the Sixth Annual AIS Student Leadership Conference and Competition receiving first and second place. These victories mark four straight years of Temple’s clinching a first-place at the AIS conference – further affirming a remarkable year for the chapter, which was recently named Distinguished Chapter by the Association for Information Systems (AIS).

Held over April 9-11, 2015, in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and hosted by the University of Alabama, the AIS conference hosted about 300 participants from schools around the globe, whose student teams had the opportunity to enter into various competition tracks. Fox MIS students competed in the IS that serves society track.

  • 1st Place: Ken Wunderle and James Dantonio for MyPhilly Access
    A city-wide network of kiosks that would provide essential information for the homeless population of Phila.  It is a very simple interface to allow people with varying levels of literacy and technical ability to be able to access vital information on housing, food, medical services, emergency housing, job training, and counseling.
  • 2nd Place: Stephen Scanlon, Peter Hwang, Jack Portnoy, and Matt Keenan for Got Your Back
    Designed to create transparency between Law Enforcement and Society.  Incorporates Google Glass to live stream video and data to the dispatcher, while storing the information in a Cloud database.  A real-time “second set of eyes” promotes greater safety and informed decision making for police officers in the field, and will significantly enhance both officer accountability and evidence gathering.

The AIS conference’s goal is to connect students, faculty, and corporate representatives, share best practices on operating and funding the chapter, and foster valuable (and competitive) information-system based activities. This year, as with previous years, Temple was more than up to the challenge.

Congratulations to the Temple champions!

MIS graduate programs ranked in the top 20 by US News & World Report

US News and World Report

The Fox graduate programs in Management Information Systems were ranked top 20 in the nation by U.S. News and World Report rankings of top information systems programs for 2016 (note: link requires login). The Fox graduate programs in MIS include the MBA in Information Technology Management (ITM) and the MS in Information Technology Auditing and Cyber-Security (ITACS).

In the 2016 ranking which is based on data collected in 2015, the Fox graduate programs in MIS were ranked 16th in the nation. Fox MIS moved up 6 slots from the previous rank of 22nd.

The top ranking follows a comprehensive program review in which FOX MIS was named ‘a major national player’ in 2014. In 2015, the department garnered a No. 1 Research ranking for faculty research productivity publications in top journals.

“We are very proud of our industry aligned graduate programs in MIS” said Munir Mandviwalla, Chair of the Fox School’s Management Information Systems department. 

“These programs offer industry leading topics such as analytics, IT audit, cyber-security, and design tied to certifications and industry sponsored competitions resulting in 100% placement for the MS in IT audit & cyber-security,” said Mandviwalla.

MIS ranks No. 1 in the world for research (yet again!)

FOX MIS No. 1 2015

The research output of the Temple University Fox School Management Information Systems (MIS) Department has been ranked No. 1 in the world (yet again!) in the 2014 update of the “My Vision Research” ranking (previously known as the Association for Information Systems (AIS) publications database) and in the “The University of Texas, Dallas Top 100 Business School Research Rankings™”.

FOX MIS was ranked first for the five year period 2010-2014 for publications in the top 2 Management Information Systems (MIS) journals – Management Information Systems Quarterly (MISQ) and Information Systems Research (ISR) – maintaining the leading position it has held for five years.

According to My Vision Research the department is also ranked number 1 for publications in the top 4 MIS journals for 2010-2014, these include the above and Journal of Management Information Systems (JMIS) and Journal of the Association for Information Systems (JAIS). 

In the same ranking, Paul Pavlou, Associate Dean, and the Milton T. Stauffer Professor of Information Technology and Strategy is number 1 worldwide, Associate Professor of Marketing and MIS Angelika Dimoka is number 11 worldwide, and Harry A. Cochran Professor of MIS Youngjin Yoo is number 15 worldwide for the last five year period (2010-2014) for publications in Management Information Systems Quarterly (MISQ) and Information Systems Research (ISR), the top two journals in MIS. Click here for more. 

According to the “The University of Texas, Dallas Top 100 Business School Research Rankings™” FOX MIS is co-number 1 worldwide for the last five year period (2010-2014) for publications in Management Information Systems Quarterly (MISQ) and Information Systems Research (ISR), the top two journals in MIS. The University of Texas, Dallas is co-number 1 with FOX MIS. Click here for more.

Studying the evolution of digital artifacts with ‘big data’

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a three-year grant totaling nearly $900,000 to trace human behaviors through big data. This marks the fourth NSF-awarded grant in the last five years that an interdisciplinary team of Temple faculty members has received to study the evolution of digital artifacts using large-scale digital trace data. The collaboration joins researchers from the Fox School’s Management Information Systems Department and College of Science and Technology (CST).

“When humans interact with digital systems, we leave a trace. Every call we make, every website we visit, it’s stamped with time and space information,” said Dr. Youngjin Yoo, the Harry A. Cochran Professor of Management Information Systems at the Fox School, and the research grant’s primary investigator. “What we do is constantly changing, and the trace data can act as DNA. What we focus on through this research is the repeat behaviors in humans that can be captured through digital trace data.

“Using those evolutionary patterns, we believe we can predict future behaviors of individuals and organizations. For example, by detecting the changes of commute patterns of individuals, we can predict overall public-transit systems’ performance in the future. Similarly, we want to be able to predict the changes in individual behaviors based on environmental changes. 

Yoo said he and the grant’s co-principal investigators will study digitally enabled processes in complex digital systems, which “are like a living ecosystem, in that they constantly evolve,” he said. If patterns in the trace data represent what they call “behavioral genes,” Yoo said, alterations to those behavioral routines are “gene mutations.” Eventually, he said, the research team envisions developing software that will better predict the changes to those behavioral genes.

The benefits in doing so, according to Yoo, “are endless.” In a healthcare application, trace data could develop a pattern by which a patient sees a doctor or produce an average cost of care per patient. In an industry sense, such “gene mutations” could impact performance and cost.

“On the surface,” Yoo said, “all smart phones, for example, look the same. But everybody’s phone is different because of apps. It used to be that the product’s designer would make the product, and that was the end of the story. Now, it’s only the beginning. Millions of apps are downloaded. They’re changing constantly.

“Our argument is that, particularly in digital space, innovation never remains the same. It constantly changes and takes different forms.”

The research team includes: Yoo; Dr. Sunil Wattal, Associate Professor of Management Information Systems at the Fox School; Dr. Zoran Obradovic, Laura H. Carnell Professor of Data Analytics at CST; and Dr. Rob Kulathinal, Assistant Professor of Biology at the College of Science and Technology.

The NSF-awarded research grant runs through Jan. 31, 2018.

– Christopher A. VitoAdd New

Dr. Youngjin Yoo is the first Harry A. Cochran Professor of MIS at Fox

Yoo_Professorship

Getting a named professorship is like making it to a pro ball team, says Dr. Youngjin Yoo, Professor of Management Information Systems and Director, Center for Design and Innovation, Fox School of Business and Management, Temple University.  On Friday, November 14, he was named the “Harry A. Cochran Professor of Management Information Systems” at the Fox School’s Research and Teaching Award ceremony.

Harry A. Cochran is “the dean who laid the foundation upon which the Fox School of Business thrives,” said Fox School Dean, M. Moshe Porat, “being recognized as the inaugural holder of a professorship in his name is a significant honor.”

The honor is not, Yoo says, just a validation of his research but of the ideas he pursues.  The unique viewpoint– that digital technology is now ubiquitous, in every part of our lives, and that it requires a mix of creativity, innovation and even a little philosophical examination to manage and effectively use technology and the tools it creates- is one that has evolved over years of study, research and life.

“When Youngjin first came to Fox, we not only saw in him a good researcher, but also what I like to call an academic entrepreneur,” Porat said. “He’s not simply someone with an idea who follows the conventional way of thinking. He always finds a different angle, using a creative, innovative and contrarian way of thinking. He has distinguished himself in his research, in the grants he has received and in the creativity that he has brought to the Management Information Systems department and the Fox School of Business.”

Why is Yoo so creative, innovative and contrarian?  The answer dates back to Yoo’s experiences as a student in South Korea. “How,” Yoo asked then, and still ponders now, “can I think about ways to improve human lives with the tools and resources we have?” As a teenager Yoo was determined to become a government civil servant, one of the obvious paths (along with doctor, lawyer or engineer) open to smart kids growing up with limited resources. Until he entered Seoul National University and found himself studying management and business administration; the econ department didn’t want him.  At university, Yoo read a passage which he says changed his life: If academic disciplines start from pure science to applied one, then management is the ultimate destination of applied science as it explores ways to improve human lives by mobilizing all the resources that the creator has given to people.

It was also at University that his determination, and maybe his ability to be contrary, were forged. Early on he made one trivial arithmetic mistake on an exam in his operations research class and earned a low final grade, despite his protestations to the professor that it was a small mistake. Yoo spent two years studying the material and signed up for advanced operations research, determined to prove the professor wrong in his assessment of Yoo’s ability. The first day of class, he answered a question correctly and, when asked, explained his answer so well that the professor told Yoo he, too, should teach.  The professor then wrote a recommendation for Yoo to study in the U.S. Yoo earned his Ph.D. in Management at the R. H. Smith School of Business, The University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland in 1997.

The rest of the story is a multi-faceted journey of research and publishing in the areas of digital innovation, design, organizational genetics, and the societal use of technology.  He is currently a senior editor for the “MIS Quarterly” and other journals. He’s worked with industries ranging from Samsung Electronics to American Greetings and, recently, was featured (with 12 other technologists) in Philadelphia Magazine’s, “The Smartest People in Philadelphia.” And, of course, he’s taught.  His university experience is global, ranging from Sweden and China to the more local world at The Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University.

At Temple, Yoo has worked both inside and outside the classroom; he’s the Founding Director of Center for Design+Innovation at Temple. 

Design is, Yoo says, “the driver of innovation, particularly in the digital domain.  Digital technology is a force that destabilizes things…blurs the boundary of product and industry, and design is how we re-imagine things.” 

So, like musical notes or written language, digital technology will never “remain in a box” and must be created and re-created. “Design is inseparable” from digital technology, Yoo says. The necessary creativity can be found in surprising places.

Recently, Yoo’s taken his work to the streets of Philadelphia and brought Philly teenagers onto campus via Temple’s Urban Apps and Maps Studios program (funded by The Knight Foundation and EDA.) The project teaches teens design, coding, and story telling so they can create apps that help solve problems encountered by residents of urban communities—like turning vacant lots into viable urban community farms. The students are “awesome” Yoo says.  “They do things we don’t think about…a goldmine of creativity.”

Yoo says that working with high school students isn’t the only surprise he’s encountered over the past few years.  The fact that he’s become a named professor, his own success, still seems to startle him. He’s “honored, flattered…it’s great news.” But he’s not ready to rest on his laurels or bask in his new title. Yoo’s moving forward by looking back—at 200 years of technology, and how it was managed and has been a driver of economic change.  

That econ department in Korea?  They don’t know what they missed.

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